edoc

Mosquito net use in early childhood and survival to adulthood in Tanzania

Fink, G. and Mrema, S. and Abdulla, S. and Kachur, P. and Khatib, R. and Lengeler, C. and Masanja, H. and Okumu, F. and Schellenberg, D.. (2022) Mosquito net use in early childhood and survival to adulthood in Tanzania. The New England journal of medicine, 386. pp. 428-436.

Full text not available from this repository.

Official URL: https://edoc.unibas.ch/90469/

Downloads: Statistics Overview

Abstract

BACKGROUND It has been hypothesized that in high-transmission settings, malaria control in early childhood (<5 years of age) might delay the acquisition of functional immunity and shift child deaths from younger to older ages. METHODS We used data from a 22-year prospective cohort study in rural southern Tanzania to estimate the association between early-life use of treated nets and survival to adulthood. All the children born between January 1, 1998, and August 30, 2000, in the study area were invited to enroll in a longitudinal study from 1998 through 2003. Adult survival outcomes were verified in 2019 through community outreach and mobile telephones. We used Cox proportional-hazards models to estimate the association between the use of treated nets in early childhood and survival to adulthood, adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS A total of 6706 children were enrolled. In 2019, we verified information on the vital status of 5983 participants (89%). According to reports of early-life community outreach visits, approximately one quarter of children never slept under a treated net, one half slept under a treated net some of the time, and the remaining quarter always slept under a treated net. Participants who were reported to have used treated nets at half the early-life visits or more had a hazard ratio for death of 0.57 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.45 to 0.72) as compared with those who were reported to have used treated nets at less than half the visits. The corresponding hazard ratio between 5 years of age and adulthood was 0.93 (95% CI, 0.58 to 1.49). CONCLUSIONS In this long-term study of early-life malaria control in a high-transmission setting, the survival benefit from early-life use of treated nets persisted to adulthood. (Funded by the Eckenstein-Geigy Professorship and others.)
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Health Interventions > Malaria Interventions (Lengeler)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Household Economics and Health Systems Research > Epidemiology and Household Economics (Fink)
06 Faculty of Business and Economics > Departement Wirtschaftswissenschaften > Professuren Wirtschaftswissenschaften > Epidemiology and Household Economics (Fink)
06 Faculty of Business and Economics > Departement Wirtschaftswissenschaften > Professuren Wirtschaftswissenschaften
UniBasel Contributors:Fink, G√ľnther and Lengeler, Christian
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
ISSN:0028-4793
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Identification Number:
Last Modified:13 Jan 2023 04:10
Deposited On:21 Dec 2022 19:00

Repository Staff Only: item control page