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Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour, Weight Status, and Body Composition among South African Primary Schoolchildren

Gerber, Markus and Lang, Christin and Beckmann, Johanna and du Randt, Rosa and Long, Kurt Z. and Müller, Ivan and Nienaber, Madeleine and Probst-Hensch, Nicole and Steinmann, Peter and Pühse, Uwe and Utzinger, Jürg and Nqweniso, Siphesihle and Walter, Cheryl. (2022) Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour, Weight Status, and Body Composition among South African Primary Schoolchildren. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19 (18). p. 11836.

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Abstract

Background:; Over the past decades, childhood overweight has increased in many African countries. We examined the relationship between sedentary behaviour, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and body composition in South African primary schoolchildren living in peri-urban settings.; Methods:; MVPA was measured via 7-day accelerometry and body composition via bioelectrical impedance analysis in 1090 learners (49.2% girls, M; age; = 8.3 ± 1.4 years). The relationships between MVPA and sedentary behaviour with the various body composition indicators (body fat and fat-free mass [total, truncal, arms, and legs], bone mass, muscle mass, and body water) were tested with mixed linear regressions.; Results:; The prevalence of overweight and obesity was 9.8% and 6.6%, respectively; 77.1% of the children engaged in ≥60 min of MVPA/day. Girls were more likely to be overweight/obese, to accumulate less than 60 min of MVPA/day, and had significantly higher relative body fat than boys (; p; s < 0.001). Lower MVPA was associated with a higher likelihood of being overweight/obese, higher relative body fat, and lower relative fat-free mass, bone mass, muscle mass, and body water (; p; s < 0.001). For lower sedentary behaviour, the associations with body composition pointed in the opposite direction.; Conclusions:; In this South African setting, girls are a particularly relevant target group for future physical activity interventions to prevent overweight/obesity-related non-communicable diseases in later life.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Chronic Disease Epidemiology > Genetic Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases (Probst-Hensch)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Public Health > Sozial- und Präventivmedizin > Genetic Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases (Probst-Hensch)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Sport, Bewegung und Gesundheit > Bereich Sportwissenschaft > Sportwissenschaften (Pühse)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Former Units within Swiss TPH > Health Impact Assessment (Utzinger)
UniBasel Contributors:Gerber, Markus and Beckmann, Johanna and Müller, Ivan and Pühse, Uwe and Lang, Christin and Long, Kurt and Steinmann, Peter and Probst-Hensch, Nicole and Utzinger, Jürg
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:MDPI
e-ISSN:1660-4601
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Language:English
Identification Number:
edoc DOI:
Last Modified:14 Dec 2022 10:58
Deposited On:30 Sep 2022 18:25

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