edoc

Associations between natural resource extraction and incidence of acute and chronic health conditions: evidence from Tanzania

Lyatuu, I. and Loss, G. and Farnham, A. and Lyatuu, G. W. and Fink, G. and Winkler, M. S.. (2021) Associations between natural resource extraction and incidence of acute and chronic health conditions: evidence from Tanzania. Int J Environ Res Public Health, 18 (11). p. 6052.

[img] PDF - Published Version
Available under License CC BY (Attribution).

558Kb

Official URL: https://edoc.unibas.ch/89153/

Downloads: Statistics Overview

Abstract

Natural resource extraction projects are often accompanied by complex environmental and social-ecological changes. In this paper, we evaluated the association between commodity extraction and the incidence of diseases. We retrieved council (district)-level outpatient data from all public and private health facilities from the District Health Information System (DHIS2). We combined this information with population data from the 2012 national population census and a geocoded list of resource extraction projects from the Geological Survey of Tanzania (GST). We used Poisson regression with random effects and cluster-robust standard errors to estimate the district-level associations between the presence of three types of commodity extraction (metals, gemstone, and construction materials) and the total number of patients in each disease category in each year. Metal extraction was associated with reduced incidence of several diseases, including chronic diseases (IRR = 0.61, CI: 0.47-0.80), mental health disorders (IRR = 0.66, CI: 0.47-0.92), and undernutrition (IRR = 0.69, CI: 0.55-0.88). Extraction of construction materials was associated with an increased incidence of chronic diseases (IRR = 1.47, CI: 1.15-1.87). This study found that the presence of natural resources commodity extraction is significantly associated with changes in disease-specific patient volumes reported in Tanzania's DHIS2. These associations differed substantially between commodities, with the most protective effects shown from metal extraction.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Urban Public Health > Health Impact Assessment (Winkler)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Household Economics and Health Systems Research > Epidemiology and Household Economics (Fink)
06 Faculty of Business and Economics > Departement Wirtschaftswissenschaften > Professuren Wirtschaftswissenschaften > Epidemiology and Household Economics (Fink)
UniBasel Contributors:Lyatuu, Isaac and Loss, Georg and Farnham, Andrea and Fink, G√ľnther and Winkler, Mirko
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Language:English
Related URLs:
Identification Number:
edoc DOI:
Last Modified:20 Dec 2022 12:01
Deposited On:20 Dec 2022 12:01

Repository Staff Only: item control page