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Rumination About Obsessive Symptoms and Mood Maintains Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms and Depressed Mood: An Experimental Study

Wahl, Karina and van den Hout, Marcel and Heinzel, Carlotta V. and Kollárik, Martin and Meyer, Andrea and Benoy, Charles and Berberich, Götz and Domschke, Katharina and Gloster, Andrew and Gradwohl, Gassan and Hofecker, Maria and Jähne, Andreas and Koch, Stefan and Külz, Anne Katrin and Moggi, Franz and Poppe, Christine and Riedel, Andreas and Rufer, Michael and Stierle, Christian and Voderholzer, Ulrich and Walther, Sebastian and Lieb, Roselind. (2021) Rumination About Obsessive Symptoms and Mood Maintains Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms and Depressed Mood: An Experimental Study. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 130 (5). pp. 435-442.

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Abstract

Rumination is common in individuals diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). We sought to clarify the causal role of rumination in the immediate and intermediate maintenance of obsessive-compulsive symptoms and depressed mood. In total, 145 individuals diagnosed with OCD were asked to read aloud their most distressing obsessive thought (OT). OT activation was followed by a thought-monitoring phase in which frequency of the OT was assessed. Participants were randomly allocated to one of three experimental conditions: rumination about obsessive-compulsive symptoms, rumination about mood, or distraction. Ratings of distress, urge to neutralize, and depressed mood and frequency ratings of the OTs were taken before and after the experimental manipulation. Obsessive-compulsive symptom severity and affect were assessed 2, 4, and 24 hr after the laboratory experiment using ecological momentary assessment. Compared to distraction, both types of rumination resulted in an immediate reduced decline of distress, urge to neutralize, depressed mood, and frequency of OTs, with medium to large effect sizes. Rumination about obsessive-compulsive symptoms did not have a stronger immediate effect than rumination about mood. Rumination about obsessive-compulsive symptoms increased obsessive-compulsive symptom severity and reduced positive affect compared to rumination about mood 24 hr later. Regarding negative affect, there was no difference in effect between the two types of rumination in the intermediate term. To conclude, rumination in OCD has an immediate and intermediate maintaining effect on obsessive-compulsive symptoms and mood and may require additional psychological interventions that supplement cognitive behavioral therapy.
Faculties and Departments:07 Faculty of Psychology > Departement Psychologie > Forschungsbereich Klinische Psychologie und Neurowissenschaften > Clinical Psychology and Intervention Science (Gloster)
07 Faculty of Psychology > Departement Psychologie > Forschungsbereich Klinische Psychologie und Neurowissenschaften > Klinische Psychologie und Epidemiologie (Lieb)
UniBasel Contributors:Wahl, Karina and Heinzel, Carlotta and Meyer, Andrea Hans and Gloster, Andrew and Lieb, Roselind
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:American Psychological Association
ISSN:0021-843X
e-ISSN:1939-1846
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Language:English
Language:English
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Last Modified:17 Feb 2022 09:13
Deposited On:17 Feb 2022 09:13

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