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Regular physical activity levels and incidence of restrictive spirometry pattern: a longitudinal analysis of 2 population-based cohorts

Carsin, Anne-Elie and Keidel, Dirk and Fuertes, Elaine and Imboden, Medea and Weyler, Joost and Nowak, Dennis and Heinrich, Joachim and Erquicia, Silvia Pascual and Martinez-Moratalla, Jesus and Huerta, Ismael and Sanchez, Jose-Luis and Schaffner, Emmanuel and Caviezel, Seraina and Beckmeyer-Borowko, Anna and Raherison, Chantal and Pin, Isabelle and Demoly, Pascal and Leynaert, Bénédicte and Cerveri, Isa and Squillacioti, Giulia and Accordini, Simone and Gislason, Thorarinn and Svanes, Cecilie and Toren, Kjell and Forsberg, Bertill and Janson, Christer and Jogi, Rain and Emtner, Margareta and Real, Francisco Gómez and Jarvis, Debbie and Guerra, Stefano and Dharmage, Shyamali C. and Probst-Hensch, Nicole and Garcia-Aymerich, Judith. (2020) Regular physical activity levels and incidence of restrictive spirometry pattern: a longitudinal analysis of 2 population-based cohorts. American Journal of Epidemiology, 189 (12). pp. 1521-1528.

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Official URL: https://edoc.unibas.ch/82076/

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Abstract

We estimated the association between regular physical activity and the incidence of restrictive spirometry pattern. Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and physical activity were assessed in 2 population-based European cohorts (European Community Respiratory Health Survey: n = 2,757, aged 39-67 years; and Swiss Study on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Diseases in Adults: n = 2,610, aged 36-82 years) first in 2000-2002 and again approximately 10 years later (2010-2013). Subjects with restrictive or obstructive spirometry pattern at baseline were excluded. We assessed the association of being active at baseline (defined as being physically active at least 2-3 times/week for ≥1 hour) with restrictive spirometry pattern at follow-up (defined as a postbronchodilation FEV1/FVC ratio of at least the lower limit of normal and FVC of <80% predicted) using modified Poisson regression, adjusting for relevant confounders. After 10 years of follow-up, 3.3% of participants had developed restrictive spirometry pattern. Being physically active was associated with a lower risk of developing this phenotype (relative risk = 0.76, 95% confidence interval: 0.59, 0.98). This association was stronger among those who were overweight and obese than among those of normal weight (P for interaction = 0.06). In 2 large European studies, adults practicing regular physical activity were at lower risk of developing restrictive spirometry pattern over 10 years.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Chronic Disease Epidemiology > Genetic Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases (Probst-Hensch)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Public Health > Sozial- und Präventivmedizin > Genetic Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases (Probst-Hensch)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Biostatistics > Biostatistics Frequentist Modelling (Kwiatkowski)
UniBasel Contributors:Keidel, Dirk and Imboden, Medea and Caviezel, Seraina and Schaffner, Emmanuel and Probst Hensch, Nicole and Beckmeyer-Borowko, Anna
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0002-9262
e-ISSN:1476-6256
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Identification Number:
Last Modified:12 Apr 2021 10:10
Deposited On:12 Apr 2021 10:10

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