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Reporting Quality of Journal Abstracts for Surgical Randomized Controlled Trials Before and After the Implementation of the CONSORT Extension for Abstracts

Speich, Benjamin and Mc Cord, Kimberly A. and Agarwal, Arnav and Gloy, Viktoria and Gryaznov, Dmitry and Moffa, Giusi and Hopewell, Sally and Briel, Matthias. (2019) Reporting Quality of Journal Abstracts for Surgical Randomized Controlled Trials Before and After the Implementation of the CONSORT Extension for Abstracts. World Journal of Surgery, 43 (10). pp. 2371-2378.

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Official URL: https://edoc.unibas.ch/81040/

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Abstract

Adequate reporting is crucial in full-text publications but even more so in abstracts because they are the most frequently read part of a publication. In 2008, an extension for abstracts of the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT-A) statement was published, defining which items should be reported in abstracts of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Therefore, we compared the adherence of RCT abstracts to CONSORT-A before and after the publication of CONSORT-A. RCTs published in the five surgical journals with the highest impact factor were identified through PubMed for 2005–2007 and 2014–2016. Adherence to 15 CONSORT-A items and two additional items for abstracts of non-pharmacological trials was assessed in duplicate. We compared the overall adherence to CONSORT-A between the two time periods using an unpaired t test and explored adherence to specific items. A total of 192 and 164 surgical RCT abstracts were assessed (2005–2007 and 2014–2016, respectively). In the pre-CONSORT-A phase, the mean score of adequately reported items was 6.14 (95% confidence interval [CI] 5.90–6.38) and 8.11 in the post-CONSORT-A phase (95% CI 7.83–8.39; mean difference 1.97, 95% CI 1.60–2.34; p < 0.0001). The comparison of individual items indicated a significant improvement in 9 of the 15 items. The three least reported items in the post-CONSORT-A phase were randomization (2.4%), blinding (13.4%), and funding (0.0%). Specific items for non-pharmacological trials were rarely reported (approximately 10%). The reporting in abstracts of surgical RCTs has improved after the implementation of CONSORT-A. More importantly, there is still ample room for improvement.
Faculties and Departments:05 Faculty of Science > Departement Mathematik und Informatik > Mathematik > Statistik (Moffa)
UniBasel Contributors:Moffa, Giusi
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0364-2313
e-ISSN:1432-2323
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
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Last Modified:13 Apr 2021 14:17
Deposited On:13 Apr 2021 14:17

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