edoc

"We treat humans, not herds!" : a qualitative study of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers' individualized approaches to vaccination in Switzerland

Deml, Michael J. and Notter, Julia and Kliem, Paulina and Buhl, Andrea and Huber, Benedikt M. and Pfeiffer, Constanze and Burton-Jeangros, Claudine and Tarr, Philip E.. (2019) "We treat humans, not herds!" : a qualitative study of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers' individualized approaches to vaccination in Switzerland. Social Science & Medicine, 240. p. 112556.

Full text not available from this repository.

Official URL: https://edoc.unibas.ch/72070/

Downloads: Statistics Overview

Abstract

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers' roles in parents' decision-making about vaccinations for their children have only recently begun receiving research attention, despite studies showing CAM to be used by 25-50% of the population in Western countries. This article examines how CAM practitioners discuss vaccinations with parents in Switzerland, with a focus on childhood vaccinations and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccinations. We describe how the CAM providers we interviewed (N = 17) and observed during vaccination consultations (N = 18 observations with 5 providers) employed individualized approaches to vaccination. Triangulation of qualitative evidence from interviews and observations allowed us to analyze their discourses and descriptions of experiences (i.e. what they said) and their practices in situ (i.e. what they did). Evidence gathered shows that practitioners framed vaccination decisions as choices at individual and family levels rather than focusing on public health benefits and consequences. They articulated their perspectives in terms of personal clinical experiences and parents' wishes, concerns, and contexts. Such findings challenge recurring narratives depicting CAM providers as categorically anti-vaccination and suggest that approaches to address vaccine hesitancy in clinical practice could benefit from communication and relational approaches similar to those demonstrated by participants in this study. Such approaches include taking time to understand parents' wishes, involving them in vaccination decisions, and taking their concerns seriously.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Society, Gender and Health > Medical Anthropology (Obrist)
UniBasel Contributors:Deml, Michael and Pfeiffer, Constanze Dorothee D.
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0277-9536
e-ISSN:1873-5347
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Identification Number:
Last Modified:08 Oct 2019 13:29
Deposited On:08 Oct 2019 13:29

Repository Staff Only: item control page