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Morbidity profile and sociodemographic characteristics of unaccompanied refugee minors seen by paediatric practices between October 2014 and February 2016 in Bavaria, Germany

Kloning, Teresa and Nowotny, Thomas and Alberer, Martin and Hoelscher, Michael and Hoffmann, Axel and Froeschl, Guenter. (2018) Morbidity profile and sociodemographic characteristics of unaccompanied refugee minors seen by paediatric practices between October 2014 and February 2016 in Bavaria, Germany. BMC public health, 18. p. 983.

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Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the morbidity profile and the sociodemographic characteristics of unaccompanied refugee minors (URM) arriving in the region of Bavaria, Germany, between October 2014 and February 2016.; The retrospective cross sectional study included 154 unaccompanied refugee minors between 10 and 18 years of age. The data was derived from medical data records of their routine first medical examination in two paediatric practices and one collective housing for refugees in the region of Bavaria, Germany.; Only 12.3% of all participants had no clinical finding at arrival. Main health findings were skin diseases (31.8%) and mental disorders (25%). In this cohort the hepatitis A immunity was 92.8%, but only 34.5% showed a constellation of immunity against hepatitis B. Suspect cases for tuberculosis were found in 5.8% of the URM. There were no HIV positive individuals in the cohort. Notably, 2 females were found to have undergone genital mutilations.; The majority of arriving URM appear to have immediate health care needs, whereas the pathologies involved are mostly common entities that are generally known to the primary health care system in Germany. Outbreaks due to hepatitis A virus are unlikely since herd immunity can be assumed, while this population would benefit from hepatitis B vaccination due to low immunity and high risk of infection in crowded housing conditions. One key finding is the absence of common algorithms and guidelines in health care provision to URM.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
UniBasel Contributors:Kloning, Teresa and Hoffmann, Axel
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1471-2458
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Language:English
Identification Number:
Last Modified:11 Sep 2018 12:10
Deposited On:11 Sep 2018 12:10

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