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Sleep spindle characteristics and arousability from nighttime transportation noise exposure in healthy young and older individuals

Rudzik, Franziska and Thiesse, Laurie and Pieren, Reto and Wunderli, Jean Marc and Brink, Mark and Foraster, Maria and Héritier, Harris and Eze, Ikenna C. and Garbazza, Corrado and Vienneau, Danielle and Probst-Hensch, Nicole and Röösli, Martin and Cajochen, Christian. (2018) Sleep spindle characteristics and arousability from nighttime transportation noise exposure in healthy young and older individuals. Sleep, 41 (7). zsy077.

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Official URL: https://edoc.unibas.ch/65021/

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Abstract

Nighttime transportation noise elicits awakenings, sleep-stage changes, and electroencephalographic (EEG) arousals. Here, we investigated the potential sleep-protective role of sleep spindles on noise-induced sleep alterations.; Twenty-six young (19-33 years, 12 women) and 18 older (52-70 years, 9 women) healthy volunteers underwent a repeated measures polysomnographic 6-day laboratory study. Participants spent one noise-free baseline night, followed by four transportation noise-exposure nights (road traffic or railway noise; continuous or intermittent: average sound levels of 45 dB, maximum sound levels of 50-62 dB), and one noise-free recovery night. Sleep stages were scored manually and fast sleep spindle characteristics were quantified automatically using an individual band-pass filtering approach.; Nighttime exposure to transportation noise significantly increased sleep EEG arousal indices. Sleep structure and continuity were not differentially affected by noise exposure in individuals with a low versus a high spindle rate. Spindle rates showed an age-related decline along with more noise-induced sleep alterations. All-night spindle rates did not predict EEG arousal or awakening probability from single railway noise events. Spindle characteristics were affected in noise-exposure nights compared to noise-free nights: we observed a reduction of the spindle amplitude in both age groups and of the spindle rate in the older group.; We have evidence that spindle rate is more likely to represent a trait phenomenon, which does not seem to play a sleep-protective role in nighttime transportation noise-induced sleep disruptions. However, the marked reduction in spindle amplitude is most likely a sensitive index for noise-induced sleep alterations.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Chronic Disease Epidemiology > Genetic Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases (Probst-Hensch)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Public Health > Sozial- und Präventivmedizin > Genetic Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases (Probst-Hensch)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Environmental Exposures and Health > Physical Hazards and Health (Röösli)
UniBasel Contributors:Foraster Pulido, Maria and Héritier, Harris and Eze, Ikenna C. and Probst-Hensch, Nicole and Röösli, Martin
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:Raven Press
ISSN:0161-8105
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Identification Number:
Last Modified:05 Sep 2018 07:57
Deposited On:05 Sep 2018 07:57

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