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Topographic mapping of the interfaces between human and aquatic mosquito habitats to enable barrier targeting of interventions against malaria vectors

Mwakalinga, Victoria M. and Sartorius, Benn K. D. and Limwagu, Alex J. and Mlacha, Yeromin P. and Msellemu, Daniel F. and Chaki, Prosper P. and Govella, Nicodem J. and Coetzee, Maureen and Dongus, Stefan and Killeen, Gerry F.. (2018) Topographic mapping of the interfaces between human and aquatic mosquito habitats to enable barrier targeting of interventions against malaria vectors. Royal Society Open Science, 5. p. 161055.

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Abstract

Geophysical topographic metrics of local water accumulation potential are freely available and have long been known as high-resolution predictors of where aquatic habitats for immature Anopheles mosquitoes are most abundant, resulting in elevated densities of adult malaria vectors and human infection burden. Using existing entomological and epidemiological survey data, here we illustrate how topography can also be used to map out the interfaces between wet, unoccupied valleys and dry, densely populated uplands, where malaria vector densities and infection risk are focally exacerbated. These topographically identifiable geophysical boundaries experience disproportionately high vector densities and malaria transmission risk, because this is where Anopheles mosquitoes first encounter humans when they search for blood after emerging or ovipositing in the valleys. Geophysical topographic indicators accounted for 67% of variance for vector density but for only 43% for infection prevalence, so they could enable very selective targeting of interventions against the former but not the latter (targeting ratios of 5.7 versus 1.5 to 1, respectively). So, in addition to being useful for targeting larval source management to wet valleys, geophysical topographic indicators may also be used to selectively target adult Anopheles mosquitoes with insecticidal residual sprays, fencing, vapour emanators or space sprays to barrier areas along their fringes.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Environmental Exposures and Health > Physical Hazards and Health (Röösli)
UniBasel Contributors:Dongus, Stefan
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:The Royal Society
e-ISSN:2054-5703
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Language:English
Identification Number:
Last Modified:07 Sep 2018 11:42
Deposited On:03 Jul 2018 09:23

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