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Physical activity and dual disease burden among South African primary schoolchildren from disadvantaged neighbourhoods

Gerber, Markus and Müller, Ivan and Walter, Cheryl and du Randt, Rosa and Adams, Larissa and Gall, Stefanie and Joubert, Nandi and Nqweniso, Siphesihle and Smith, Danielle and Steinmann, Peter and Probst-Hensch, Nicole and Utzinger, Jürg and Pühse, Uwe. (2018) Physical activity and dual disease burden among South African primary schoolchildren from disadvantaged neighbourhoods. Preventive medicine, 112. pp. 104-110.

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Official URL: https://edoc.unibas.ch/63921/

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Abstract

People from low- and middle-income countries still face challenges stemming from parasitic infections. Additionally, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and their risk factors are rapidly increasing, which puts South African children at an elevated risk of a dual disease burden, with negative consequences for child development and wellbeing. Contrastingly, regular physical activity (PA) is associated with decreased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine whether PA is associated with the double infection-CVD phenotype burden in South African schoolchildren. 801 children (402 boys, 399 girls; mean age 9.5 years) from eight schools from disadvantaged neighbourhoods were included. Data assessment took place between February and March 2015 in Port Elizabeth, South Africa. Children who achieved PA recommendations (physically active on 6-7 days/week for at least 60 min), who were active, but below recommended standards (2-5 physically active days/week), or who were insufficiently active on almost all days (0-1 physically active days/week) were compared with regard to systolic and diastolic blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), percent body fat, and infection with soil-transmitted helminths. Moderate and high self-reported PA levels were associated with lower BMI, lower body fat, and lower risk of being hypertensive. Conversely, children with high self-reported PA were more likely to be infected with soil-transmitted helminths than peers with low PA levels. Promoting PA in disadvantaged areas is worthwhile to prevent NCD later in life, but should be combined with regular anthelminthic treatment to comprehensively improve children's health and wellbeing.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Chronic Disease Epidemiology > Genetic Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases (Probst-Hensch)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Public Health > Sozial- und Präventivmedizin > Genetic Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases (Probst-Hensch)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Eco System Health Sciences > Health Impact Assessment (Utzinger)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Swiss Centre for International Health > Health Systems Support (Prytherch)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Sport, Bewegung und Gesundheit > Bereich Sportwissenschaft > Sport und psychosoziale Gesundheit (Gerber)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Sport, Bewegung und Gesundheit > Bereich Sportwissenschaft > Sportwissenschaften (Pühse)
UniBasel Contributors:Steinmann, Peter and Probst Hensch, Nicole and Utzinger, Jürg and Gerber, Markus and Müller, Iwan Martin and Gall, Stefanie and Pühse, Uwe
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1096-0260
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Identification Number:
Last Modified:04 Jul 2018 08:06
Deposited On:03 Jul 2018 08:41

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