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The invasive bighead goby Ponticola kessleri displays large-scale genetic similarities and small-scale genetic differentiation in relation to shipping patterns

Adrian-Kalchhauser, I. and Hirsch, P. E. and Behrmann-Godel, J. and N'Guyen, A. and Watzlawczyk, S. and Gertzen, S. and Borcherding, J. and Burkhardt-Holm, P.. (2016) The invasive bighead goby Ponticola kessleri displays large-scale genetic similarities and small-scale genetic differentiation in relation to shipping patterns. Molecular Ecology, 25 (9). pp. 1925-1943.

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Abstract

Colonization events, range expansions and species invasions leave genetic signatures in the genomes of invasive organisms and produce intricate special patterns. Predictions have been made as to how those patterns arise, but only very rarely, genetic processes can be monitored in real time during range expansions. In an attempt to change that, we track a very recently established invasive population of a fish species, the bighead goby Ponticola kessleri, with high temporal and spatial resolution through 2 years to identify patterns over time. We then compare Swiss and German samples of bighead goby along the river Rhine using microsatellites, mitochondrial D-loop sequences and geometric morphometrics to investigate geographic patterns. We detect weak temporal and strong geographic patterns in the data, which are inconsistent with isolation by distance and indicate long range transport. In search of an explanation for our observations, we analyse the vector properties and travel patterns of commercial vessels on the river Rhine. We present evidence that freshwater cargo ships and tankers are plausible vectors for larvae of invasive goby species. We also present indications that cargo ships and tankers act as differential vectors for this species. In summary, we present genetic data at unique temporal resolution from a vertebrate invasion front and substantiate the paramount role of commercial shipping in freshwater fish translocations.
Faculties and Departments:05 Faculty of Science > Departement Umweltwissenschaften
UniBasel Contributors:Adrian-Kalchhauser, Irene
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:0962-1083
e-ISSN:1365-294X
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Language:English
Identification Number:
Last Modified:02 Feb 2018 12:24
Deposited On:02 Feb 2018 12:24

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