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Long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and traffic noise and incident hypertension in seven cohorts of the European study of cohorts for air pollution effects (ESCAPE)

Fuks, Kateryna B. and Weinmayr, Gudrun and Basagaña, Xavier and Gruzieva, Olena and Hampel, Regina and Oftedal, Bente and Sørensen, Mette and Wolf, Kathrin and Aamodt, Geir and Aasvang, Gunn Marit and Aguilera, Inmaculada and Becker, Thomas and Beelen, Rob and Brunekreef, Bert and Caracciolo, Barbara and Cyrys, Josef and Elosua, Roberto and Eriksen, Kirsten Thorup and Foraster, Maria and Fratiglioni, Laura and Hilding, Agneta and Houthuijs, Danny and Korek, Michal and Künzli, Nino and Marrugat, Jaume and Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark and Östenson, Claes-Göran and Penell, Johanna and Pershagen, Göran and Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole and Swart, Wim J. R. and Peters, Annette and Hoffmann, Barbara. (2017) Long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and traffic noise and incident hypertension in seven cohorts of the European study of cohorts for air pollution effects (ESCAPE). European heart journal, 38 (13). pp. 983-990.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/55094/

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Abstract

We investigated whether traffic-related air pollution and noise are associated with incident hypertension in European cohorts.; We included seven cohorts of the European study of cohorts for air pollution effects (ESCAPE). We modelled concentrations of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 µm (PM2.5), ≤10 µm (PM10), >2.5, and ≤10 µm (PMcoarse), soot (PM2.5 absorbance), and nitrogen oxides at the addresses of participants with land use regression. Residential exposure to traffic noise was modelled at the facade according to the EU Directive 2002/49/EC. We assessed hypertension as (i) self-reported and (ii) measured (systolic BP ≥ 140 mmHg or diastolic BP ≥ 90 mmHg or intake of BP lowering medication (BPLM). We used Poisson regression with robust variance estimation to analyse associations of traffic-related exposures with incidence of hypertension, controlling for relevant confounders, and combined the results from individual studies with random-effects meta-analysis. Among 41 072 participants free of self-reported hypertension at baseline, 6207 (15.1%) incident cases occurred within 5-9 years of follow-up. Incidence of self-reported hypertension was positively associated with PM2.5 (relative risk (RR) 1.22 [95%-confidence interval (CI):1.08; 1.37] per 5 µg/m³) and PM2.5 absorbance (RR 1.13 [95% CI:1.02; 1.24] per 10 - 5m - 1). These estimates decreased slightly upon adjustment for road traffic noise. Road traffic noise was weakly positively associated with the incidence of self-reported hypertension. Among 10 896 participants at risk, 3549 new cases of measured hypertension occurred. We found no clear associations with measured hypertension.; Long-term residential exposures to air pollution and noise are associated with increased incidence of self-reported hypertension.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Chronic Disease Epidemiology > Air Pollution and Health (Künzli)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Public Health > Sozial- und Präventivmedizin > Air Pollution and Health (Künzli)
UniBasel Contributors:Künzli, Nino
Item Type:Article, refereed
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0195-668X
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
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Last Modified:06 Jun 2017 12:06
Deposited On:06 Jun 2017 12:06

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