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Common genetic variations in cell cycle and DNA repair pathways associated with pediatric brain tumor susceptibility

Adel Fahmideh, Maral and Lavebratt, Catharina and Schüz, Joachim and Röösli, Martin and Tynes, Tore and Grotzer, Michael A. and Johansen, Christoffer and Kuehni, Claudia E. and Lannering, Birgitta and Prochazka, Michaela and Schmidt, Lisbeth S. and Feychting, Maria. (2016) Common genetic variations in cell cycle and DNA repair pathways associated with pediatric brain tumor susceptibility. OncoTarget , 7 (39). pp. 63640-63650.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/53590/

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Abstract

Knowledge on the role of genetic polymorphisms in the etiology of pediatric brain tumors (PBTs) is limited. Therefore, we investigated the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identified by candidate gene-association studies on adult brain tumors, and PBT risk.The study is based on the largest series of PBT cases to date. Saliva DNA from 245 cases and 489 controls, aged 7-19 years at diagnosis/reference date, was genotyped for 68 SNPs. Data were analyzed using unconditional logistic regression.The results showed EGFRrs730437 and EGFRrs11506105 may decrease susceptibility to PBTs, whereas ERCC1rs3212986 may increase risk of these tumors. Moreover, stratified analyses indicated CHAF1Ars243341, CHAF1Ars2992, and XRCC1rs25487 were associated with a decreased risk of astrocytoma subtype. Furthermore, an increased risk of non-astrocytoma subtype associated with EGFRrs9642393, EME1rs12450550, ATMrs170548, and GLTSCRrs1035938 as well as a decreased risk of this subtype associated with XRCC4rs7721416 and XRCC4rs2662242 were detected.This study indicates SNPs in EGFR, ERCC1, CHAF1A, XRCC1, EME1, ATM, GLTSCR1, and XRCC4 may be associated with the risk of PBTs. Therefore, cell cycle and DNA repair pathways variations associated with susceptibility to adult brain tumors also seem to be associated with PBT risk, suggesting pediatric and adult brain tumors might share similar etiological pathways.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Environmental Exposures and Health > Physical Hazards and Health (Röösli)
UniBasel Contributors:Röösli, Martin
Item Type:Article, refereed
Publisher:Impact Journals LLC
ISSN:1949-2553
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Identification Number:
Last Modified:20 Apr 2017 11:54
Deposited On:20 Apr 2017 11:54

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