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The effect of zinc supplementation on body composition and hormone levels related to adiposity among children : a systematic review

Gunanti, Inong R. and Al-Mamun, Abdullah and Schubert, Lisa and Long, Kurt Z.. (2016) The effect of zinc supplementation on body composition and hormone levels related to adiposity among children : a systematic review. Public health nutrition, 19 (16). pp. 2924-2939.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/44614/

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Abstract

To provide a comprehensive synthesis of the effects of Zn supplementation on childhood body composition and adiposity-related hormone levels.; Five electronic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials of Zn supplementation studies published before 28 February 2015. No statistical pooling of results was carried out due to diversity in study designs.; Community- or hospital-based, from fourteen developing and developed countries.; Children and adolescents aged 0 to 10 years.; Seven of the fourteen studies reported an overall or subgroup effect of Zn supplementation on at least one parameter of body composition, when determined by anthropometric measurements (increased mid upper-arm circumference, triceps skinfold, subscapular skinfold and mid upper-arm muscle area, and decreased BMI). Three out of the fourteen studies reported increased mean value of total body water estimated by bio-impedance analysis and increased fat-free mass estimated by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and by total body water. Zn supplementation was associated with increased fat-free mass among stunted children. One study found supplementation decreased leptin and insulin concentrations.; Due to the use of anthropometry when determining body composition, a majority of the studies could not accurately address whether alterations in the fat and/or fat-free mass components of the body were responsible for the observed changes in body composition. The effect of Zn supplementation on body composition is not consistent but may modify fat-free mass among children with pre-existing growth failure.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Eco System Health Sciences > Health Impact Assessment (Utzinger)
UniBasel Contributors:Long, Kurt
Item Type:Article, refereed
Publisher:Cambridge Univ. Press
ISSN:1368-9800
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Identification Number:
Last Modified:08 Dec 2016 15:09
Deposited On:08 Dec 2016 15:09

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