edoc

Retirement and perceived social inferiority strongly link with health inequalities in older age : decomposition of a concentration index of poor health based on Polish cross-sectional data

Drożdżak, Zuzanna and Turek, Konrad. (2016) Retirement and perceived social inferiority strongly link with health inequalities in older age : decomposition of a concentration index of poor health based on Polish cross-sectional data. International journal for equity in health, 15. p. 21.

[img] PDF - Published Version
Available under License CC BY (Attribution).

510Kb

Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/42145/

Downloads: Statistics Overview

Abstract

Identifying mechanisms that generate and sustain health inequalities is a prerequisite for developing effective policy response, but little is known about factors contributing to health inequalities in older populations in post-transitional European countries such as Poland. Demographic aging of all populations requires new and deeper insights.; Data came from the Polish edition of the cross-sectional European Social Survey, Wave 6 (2012). Logistic regression was applied to identify socioeconomic factors relevant to self-assessed health in a population aged 45 or over. Decomposition of a concentration index provided information about the distribution of health-relevant demographics and social characteristics along a socioeconomic continuum, and their contributions to observed health inequalities.; Overall, 17.4 % of respondents aged 45 or over assessed their health as poor or very poor. Predictors of poor health included income insufficiency, disability or retirement, retirement, low social activity, and social position. A steep socioeconomic gradient in self-assessed health in Polish population was found. The primary contributor to the observed health inequality (as summarized by concentration index) was income, followed by labor market situation, particularly retirement. Self-assessed place in society contributed to overall inequality, scoring similarly to social activity. Contributions from age and education were moderate but non-significant, gender was negligible, and chronological aging explained neither poor health nor socioeconomic health inequalities.; Although elderly people represent a particularly vulnerable group, their disadvantages are associated with social rather than natural causes. Policies addressing health inequalities in aging populations must provide systemic opportunities for maintaining good health. Transitioning to retirement is a critical entry point for policy action that stimulates social engagement and maintains self-esteem of older people.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Society, Gender and Health > Medical Anthropology (Obrist)
UniBasel Contributors:Drozdzak, Zuzanna
Item Type:Article, refereed
ISSN:1475-9276
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Language:English
Identification Number:
Last Modified:25 Aug 2016 10:25
Deposited On:28 Apr 2016 08:54

Repository Staff Only: item control page