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Engineered cartilage generated by nasal chondrocytes is responsive to physical forces resembling joint loading

Candrian, C. and Vonwil, D. and Barbero, A. and Bonacina, E. and Miot, S. and Farhadi, J. and Wirz, D. and Dickinson, S. and Hollander, A. and Jakob, M. and Li, Z. and Alini, M. and Heberer, M. and Martin, I.. (2008) Engineered cartilage generated by nasal chondrocytes is responsive to physical forces resembling joint loading. Arthritis and rheumatism, 58 (1). pp. 197-208.

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Abstract

Objective: To determine whether engineered cartilage generated by nasal chondrocytes (ECN) is responsive to different regimens of loading associated with joint kinematics and previously shown to be stimulatory of engineered cartilage generated by articular chondrocytes (ECA). Methods. Human nasal and articular chondrocytes, harvested from 5 individuals, were expanded and cultured for 2 weeks into porous polymeric scaffolds. The resulting ECN and ECA were then maintained under static conditions or exposed to the following loading regimens: regimen 1, single application of cyclic deformation for 30 minutes; regimen 2, intermittent application of cyclic deformation for a total of 10 days, followed by static culture for 2 weeks; regimen 3, application of surface motion for a total of 10 days. Results. Prior to loading, ECN constructs contained significantly higher amounts of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and type II collagen compared with ECA constructs. ECN responded to regimen 1 by increasing collagen and proteoglycan synthesis, to regimen 2 by increasing the accumulation of GAG and type II collagen as well as the dynamic modulus, and to regimen 3 by increasing the expression of superficial zone protein, at the messenger RNA level and the protein level, as well as the release of hyaluronan. ECA constructs were overall less responsive to all loading regimens, likely due to the lower extracellular matrix content. Conclusion. Human ECN is responsive to physical forces resembling joint loading and can up-regulate molecules typically involved in joint lubrication. These findings should prompt future in vivo studies exploring the possibility of using nasal chondrocytes as a cell source for articular cartilage repair.
Faculties and Departments:03 Faculty of Medicine > Bereich Operative Fächer (Klinik) > Bewegungsapparat und Integument > Plastische, rekonstruktive, ästhetische und Handchirurgie (Schaefer)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Klinische Forschung > Bereich Operative Fächer (Klinik) > Bewegungsapparat und Integument > Plastische, rekonstruktive, ästhetische und Handchirurgie (Schaefer)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Bereich Operative Fächer (Klinik) > Bewegungsapparat und Integument > Traumatologie / Orthopädie (Jakob)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Klinische Forschung > Bereich Operative Fächer (Klinik) > Bewegungsapparat und Integument > Traumatologie / Orthopädie (Jakob)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Bereich Operative Fächer (Klinik) > Querschnittsbereich Forschung > Chirurgische Forschung (Heberer)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Klinische Forschung > Bereich Operative Fächer (Klinik) > Querschnittsbereich Forschung > Chirurgische Forschung (Heberer)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Biomedizin > Department of Biomedicine, University Hospital Basel > Tissue Engineering (Martin)
UniBasel Contributors:Heberer, Michael and Farhadi, Jian and Jakob, Marcel and Martin, Ivan
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:Wiley-Liss
ISSN:0004-3591
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Language:English
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Last Modified:29 Sep 2017 05:53
Deposited On:22 Mar 2012 13:38

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