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Malaria prevention strategies and recommendations, from chemoprophylaxis to stand-by emergency treatment: a 10-year prospective study in a Swiss Travel Clinic

Boubaker, Rim and Hérard Fossati, Annie and Meige, Pierrette and Mialet, Catherine and Ngarambe Buffat, Chantal and Rochat, Jacynthe and Souvannaraj-Blanchant, Manisinh and Uwanyiligira, Mediatrice and Widmer, Francine and Payot, Sylvie and Rochat, Laurence and de Vallière, Serge and D'Acremont, Valérie and Genton, Blaise. (2017) Malaria prevention strategies and recommendations, from chemoprophylaxis to stand-by emergency treatment: a 10-year prospective study in a Swiss Travel Clinic. Journal of travel medicine, 24 (5). pp. 1-9.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/57513/

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Abstract

There are several possible malaria prevention strategies for travellers. In Switzerland, chemoprophylaxis (CP) is recommended for persons visiting areas highly endemic for malaria and stand-by emergency treatment (SBET) for areas with moderate to low risk.; To describe the type of malaria prevention prescribed to travel clinic attendees with a specific focus on changes over time following adaptation of recommendations.; All pre-travel first consultation data recorded between November 2002 and December 2012 were included. Country-specific malaria preventive recommendations provided and medicines prescribed over time were analysed.; In total, 64 858 client-trips were recorded. 91% of travellers planned to visit a malaria endemic country. Among those clients, 42% were prescribed an antimalarial medicine as CP only, 36% as SBET only, and 3% both. Between 2002 and 2012, there was a 16% drop of CP prescription ( P < 0.001) and a 21% increase of SBET prescription ( P < 0.001). Among travellers receiving CP, the proportion of those prescribed mefloquine dropped from 82% in 2002 to 46% in 2012 while those prescribed atovaquone-proguanil (AP) increased from 7% to 39%. For those prescribed SBET, the proportion dropped from 46% to 30% for AP and increased from 2% to 61% for artemether-lumefantrine. CP prescription for travellers to India fell from 62% to 5% and SBET prescription increased from 40% to 88% after the change of recommendation from CP to SBET in 2005 for this country. Comparatively, CP prescription for travellers to Senegal, for which no change of recommendation occurred, remained relatively stable between 88% in 2002 and 89% in 2012.; This study shows the considerable decline of antimalarial prescription for chemoprophylaxis that occurred over the 10-year period in favour of SBET.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Health Interventions > Clinical Epidemiology (Genton)
UniBasel Contributors:D'Acremont, Valérie and Genton, Blaise
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:Blackwell
ISSN:1195-1982
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Identification Number:
Last Modified:21 Dec 2017 12:48
Deposited On:21 Dec 2017 12:48

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