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Obesity, weight change, and chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A longitudinal study in Taiwan

Chung, Hsin-Fang and Al Mamun, Abdullah and Huang, Meng-Chuan and Long, Kurt Z. and Huang, Ya-Fang and Shin, Shyi-Jang and Hwang, Shang-Jyh and Hsu, Chih-Cheng. (2016) Obesity, weight change, and chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A longitudinal study in Taiwan. Journal of diabetes, 9 (11). pp. 983-993.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/57478/

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Abstract

The aim of the present study was to investigate relationships between the risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and obesity and weight changes in Asian patients with type 2 diabetes.; At baseline (2003-05), 1187 diabetic patients aged 30-70 years were recruited to the study, with follow-up surveys completed in 2008, 2009, and 2010. Chronic kidney disease was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min per 1.73 m2 ; body mass index (BMI) was categorised as normal (18.5-22.9 kg/m2 ), overweight (23-27.4 kg/m2 ), or obese (≥27.5 kg/m2 ); waist circumference (WC) ≥80 cm for women and ≥90 cm for men was taken to indicate abdominal obesity. Changes in weight and WC were calculated from baseline to each follow-up survey. Relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of CKD were estimated. To estimate the risk for incident CKD, associations were examined in patients without CKD at baseline (n = 881).; Over 7 years of follow-up, obesity (RR 1.48; 95% CI 1.08-2.04; P = 0.015) and high WC (RR 1.23; 95% CI 1.00-1.52; P = 0.049) were associated with CKD after adjusting for covariates. Among participants without CKD at baseline, those who gained >10% weight (RR 1.43; 95% CI 1.07-1.90; P = 0.015) and in whom WC increased >15% (RR 1.37; 95% CI 1.01-1.85; P = 0.045) had a higher risk of incident CKD than those who remained stable (±5% changes in weight or WC).; Diabetic patients who are obese and those with excessive central fat were more likely to have CKD. Large weight gain (>10%) and increases in WC (>15%) independently predicted incident CKD.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Eco System Health Sciences > Health Impact Assessment (Utzinger)
UniBasel Contributors:Long, Kurt and Long, Kurt
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1753-0393
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
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Last Modified:21 Dec 2017 12:26
Deposited On:21 Dec 2017 12:26

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