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Long-term smoking cessation and heart rate dynamics in an aging healthy cohort : is it possible to fully recover?

Girard, Delphine and Delgado-Eckert, Edgar and Schaffner, Emmanuel and Häcki, Christoph and Adam, Martin and Stern, Georgette L. and Kumar, Nitin and Felber Dietrich, Denise and Turk, Alexander and Pons, Marco and Künzli, Nino and Gaspoz, Jean-Michel and Rochat, Thierry and Schindler, Christian and Probst-Hensch, Nicole and Frey, Urs. (2015) Long-term smoking cessation and heart rate dynamics in an aging healthy cohort : is it possible to fully recover? Environmental research, 143 (Pt A). pp. 39-48.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/39879/

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Abstract

To evaluate the long-term influence of smoking cessation on the regulation of the autonomic cardiovascular system in an aging general population, using the subpopulation of lifelong non-smokers as control group.; We analyzed 1481 participants aged ≥50 years from the SAPALDIA cohort. In each participant, heart rate variability and heart rate dynamics were characterized by means of various quantitative analyzes of the inter-beat interval time series generated from 24-hour electrocardiogram recordings. Each parameter obtained was then used as the outcome variable in multivariable linear regression models in order to evaluate the association with smoking status and time elapsed since smoking cessation. The models were adjusted for known confounding factors and stratified by the time elapsed since smoking cessation.; Our findings indicate that smoking triggers adverse changes in the regulation of the cardiovascular system, even at low levels of exposure since current light smokers exhibited significant changes as compared to lifelong non-smokers. Moreover, there was evidence for a dose-response effect. Indeed, the changes observed in current heavy smokers were more marked as compared to current light smokers. Furthermore, full recovery was achieved in former smokers (i.e., normalization to the level of lifelong non-smokers). However, while light smokers fully recovered within the 15 first years of cessation, heavy former smokers might need up to 15-25 years to fully recover.; This study supports the substantial benefits of smoking cessation, but also warns of important long-term alterations caused by heavy smoking.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Chronic Disease Epidemiology > Genetic Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases (Probst-Hensch)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Public Health > Sozial- und Präventivmedizin > Genetic Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases (Probst-Hensch)
UniBasel Contributors:Schaffner, Emmanuel and Felber Dietrich, Denise and Künzli, Nino and Schindler, Christian and Probst Hensch, Nicole
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1096-0953
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Identification Number:
Last Modified:30 Jun 2016 11:00
Deposited On:28 Jan 2016 09:56

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