edoc

Distribution and risk factors for Plasmodium and helminth co-infections: a cross-sectional survey among children in Bagamoyo district, coastal region of Tanzania

Salim, Nahya and Knopp, Stefanie and Lweno, Omar and Abdul, Ummi and Mohamed, Ali and Schindler, Tobias and Rothen, Julian and Masimba, John and Kwaba, Denis and Mohammed, Alisa S. and Althaus, Fabrice and Abdulla, Salim and Tanner, Marcel and Daubenberger, Claudia and Genton, Blaise. (2015) Distribution and risk factors for Plasmodium and helminth co-infections: a cross-sectional survey among children in Bagamoyo district, coastal region of Tanzania. PLoS neglected tropical diseases, Vol. 9, H. 4 , e0003660.

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
Available under License CC BY (Attribution).

2817Kb

Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6373545

Downloads: Statistics Overview

Abstract

Plasmodium and soil transmitted helminth infections (STH) are a major public health problem, particularly among children. There are conflicting findings on potential association between these two parasites. This study investigated the Plasmodium and helminth co-infections among children aged 2 months to 9 years living in Bagamoyo district, coastal region of Tanzania.; A community-based cross-sectional survey was conducted among 1033 children. Stool, urine and blood samples were examined using a broad set of quality controlled diagnostic methods for common STH (Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm, Strongyloides stercoralis, Enterobius vermicularis, Trichuris trichura), schistosoma species and Wuchereria bancrofti. Blood slides and malaria rapid diagnostic tests (mRDTs) were utilized for Plasmodium diagnosis.; Out of 992 children analyzed, the prevalence of Plasmodium infection was 13% (130/992), helminth 28.5% (283/992); 5% (50/992) had co-infection with Plasmodium and helminth. The prevalence rate of Plasmodium, specific STH and co-infections increased significantly with age (p > 0.001), with older children mostly affected except for S. stercoralis monoinfection and co-infections. Spatial variations of co-infection prevalence were observed between and within villages. There was a trend for STH infections to be associated with Plasmodium infection [OR adjusted for age group 1.4, 95% CI (1.0-2.1)], which was more marked for S. stercoralis (OR = 2.2, 95% CI (1.1-4.3). Age and not schooling were risk factors for Plasmodium and STH co-infection.; The findings suggest that STH and Plasmodium infections tend to occur in the same children, with increasing prevalence of co-infection with age. This calls for an integrated approach such as using mass chemotherapy with dual effect (e.g., ivermectin) coupled with improved housing, sanitation and hygiene for the control of both parasitic infections.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Medical Parasitology and Infection Biology > Clinical Immunology (Daubenberger)
UniBasel Contributors:Tanner, Marcel and Daubenberger, Claudia and Genton, Blaise
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
ISSN:1935-2727
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Language:English
Related URLs:
Identification Number:
Last Modified:31 Dec 2015 10:57
Deposited On:08 May 2015 08:45

Repository Staff Only: item control page