edoc

Serum ferritin levels are associated with a distinct phenotype of chronic hepatitis C poorly responding to pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin therapy

Lange, C. M. and Kutalik, Z. and Morikawa, K. and Bibert, S. and Cerny, A. and Dollenmaier, G. and Dufour, J. F. and Gerlach, T. J. and Heim, M. H. and Malinverni, R. and Mullhaupt, B. and Negro, F. and Moradpour, D. and Bochud, P. Y.. (2012) Serum ferritin levels are associated with a distinct phenotype of chronic hepatitis C poorly responding to pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin therapy. Hepatology, Vol. 55, H. 4. pp. 1038-1047.

Full text not available from this repository.

Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6338538

Downloads: Statistics Overview

Abstract

Elevated serum ferritin levels may reflect a systemic inflammatory state as well as increased iron storage, both of which may contribute to an unfavorable outcome of chronic hepatitis C (CHC). We therefore performed a comprehensive analysis of the role of serum ferritin and its genetic determinants in the pathogenesis and treatment of CHC. To this end, serum ferritin levels at baseline of therapy with pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin or before biopsy were correlated with clinical and histological features of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, including necroinflammatory activity (N = 970), fibrosis (N = 980), steatosis (N = 886), and response to treatment (N = 876). The association between high serum ferritin levels (< median) and the endpoints was assessed by logistic regression. Moreover, a candidate gene as well as a genome-wide association study of serum ferritin were performed. We found that serum ferritin </= the sex-specific median was one of the strongest pretreatment predictors of treatment failure (univariate P 30% in both HCV genotype 1- and genotype 3-infected patients (P > 0.001). Serum ferritin levels were also independently associated with severe liver fibrosis (P > 0.0001, OR = 2.67, 95% CI = 1.68-4.25) and steatosis (P = 0.002, OR = 2.29, 95% CI = 1.35-3.91), but not with necroinflammatory activity (P = 0.3). Genetic variations had only a limited impact on serum ferritin levels. Conclusion: In patients with CHC, elevated serum ferritin levels are independently associated with advanced liver fibrosis, hepatic steatosis, and poor response to interferon-alpha-based therapy.
Faculties and Departments:03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Biomedizin > Department of Biomedicine, University Hospital Basel > Hepatology Laboratory (Heim)
UniBasel Contributors:Heim, Markus H.
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:Saunders
ISSN:0270-9139
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Related URLs:
Identification Number:
Last Modified:10 Apr 2015 09:14
Deposited On:10 Apr 2015 09:14

Repository Staff Only: item control page