edoc

Sleep fragmentation and sleep-disordered breathing in individuals living close to main roads : results from a population-based study

Gerbase, M. W. and Dratva, J. and Germond, M. and Tschopp, J. M. and Pépin, J. L. and Carballo, D. and Künzli, N. and Probst-Hensch, N. M. and Adam, M. and Zemp Stutz, E. and Roche, F. and Rochat, T.. (2014) Sleep fragmentation and sleep-disordered breathing in individuals living close to main roads : results from a population-based study. Sleep medicine, Vol. 15, Iss. 3. pp. 322-328.

Full text not available from this repository.

Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6243431

Downloads: Statistics Overview

Abstract

Nighttime traffic noise is associated with sleep disturbances, but sleep fragmentation and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) have not been demonstrated in individuals living near busy roads.; We asked 1383 participants to answer a health questionnaire and to undergo 24-h electrocardiogram (ECG). Nocturnal ECG records were used to calculate the very low frequency index (VLFI) interval, a surrogate marker of sleep fragmentation. Distances of participants' addresses to roadways were calculated using the VECTOR25© Swisstopo roads classification, a traffic noise proxy. Distances of homes within 100 or 50m of major roads defined proximity to busy roads. Adjusted multivariate logistic regressions analyzed associations between the distance of home to main roads and VLFI or self-reported SDB.; Distance of participants' homes to main roads was significantly associated with the VLFI in women (odds ratio [OR], 1.58 [confidence interval {CI}, 1.03-2.42]; P=.038) but not in men (OR, 1.35 [CI, 0.77-2.35]; P=.295). Women under hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) were at higher risk for increased VLFI when living close to main roads (OR, 2.10 [CI, 1.20-3.68]; P=.01) than untreated women (P=.584). Associations with self-reported SDB were not statistically relevant.; In our large population, women living close to main roads were at significantly higher risk for sleep fragmentation than men. The 2-fold higher risk for menopausal women under HRT underscores the vulnerability of this group.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Society, Gender and Health > Gender and Health (Zemp Stutz)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Chronic Disease Epidemiology > Genetic Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases (Probst-Hensch)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Public Health > Sozial- und Präventivmedizin > Genetic Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases (Probst-Hensch)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Chronic Disease Epidemiology > Air Pollution and Health (Künzli)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Public Health > Sozial- und Präventivmedizin > Air Pollution and Health (Künzli)
UniBasel Contributors:Probst Hensch, Nicole and Künzli, Nino and Adam, Martin and Zemp Stutz, Elisabeth and Dratva, Julia
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1389-9457
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Related URLs:
Identification Number:
Last Modified:15 Aug 2014 07:16
Deposited On:15 Aug 2014 07:16

Repository Staff Only: item control page