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Improved air quality and attenuated lung function decline : modification by obesity in the SAPALDIA cohort

Schikowski, Tamara and Schaffner, Emmanuel and Meier, Flurina and Phuleria, Harish C. and Vierkötter, Andrea and Schindler, Christian and Kriemler, Susi and Zemp, Elisabeth and Krämer, Ursula and Bridevaux, Pierre-Olivier and Rochat, Thierry and Schwartz, Joel and Künzli, Nino and Probst-Hensch, Nicole. (2013) Improved air quality and attenuated lung function decline : modification by obesity in the SAPALDIA cohort. Environmental Health Perspectives, 121 (9). pp. 1034-1039.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6174416

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Abstract

Background: Air pollution and obesity are hypothesized to contribute to accelerated decline in lung function with age through their inflammatory properties.
Objective: We investigated whether the previously reported association between improved air quality and lung health in the population-based SAPALDIA cohort is modified by obesity.
Methods: We used adjusted mixed-model analyses to estimate the association of average body mass index (BMI) and changes in particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 µm (PM10; ΔPM10) with lung function decline over a 10-year follow-up period.
Results: Lung function data and complete information were available for 4,664 participants. Age-related declines in lung function among participants with high average BMI were more rapid for FVC (forced vital capacity), but slower for FEV1/FVC (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec/FVC) and FEF25–75 (forced expiratory flow at 25–75%) than declines among those with low or normal average BMI. Improved air quality was associated with attenuated reductions in FEV1/FVC, FEF25–75, and FEF25–75/FVC over time among low- and normal-BMI participants, but not overweight or obese participants. The attenuation was most pronounced for ΔFEF25–75/FVC (30% and 22% attenuation in association with a 10-μg/m3 decrease in PM10 among low- and normal-weight participants, respectively.)
Conclusion: Our results point to the importance of considering health effects of air pollution exposure and obesity in parallel. Further research must address the mechanisms underlying the observed interaction.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Chronic Disease Epidemiology > Air Pollution and Health (Künzli)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Public Health > Sozial- und Präventivmedizin > Air Pollution and Health (Künzli)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Chronic Disease Epidemiology > Genetic Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases (Probst-Hensch)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Public Health > Sozial- und Präventivmedizin > Genetic Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases (Probst-Hensch)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
UniBasel Contributors:Schikowski, Tamara and Schaffner, Emmanuel and Phuleria, Harish Chandra and Schindler, Christian and Zemp Stutz, Elisabeth and Künzli, Nino and Probst Hensch, Nicole
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
ISSN:0091-6765
e-ISSN:1552-9924
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article -- Reproduced with permission from Environmental Health Perspectives
Language:English
Identification Number:
Last Modified:08 Sep 2017 12:55
Deposited On:23 May 2014 08:34

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