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Near-roadway pollution and childhood asthma : implications for developing 'win-win' compact urban development and clean vehicle strategies

Perez, L. and Lurmann, F. and Wilson, J. and Pastor, M. and Brandt, S. J. and Künzli, N. and McConnell, R.. (2012) Near-roadway pollution and childhood asthma : implications for developing 'win-win' compact urban development and clean vehicle strategies. Environmental Health Perspectives, 120 (11). pp. 1619-1626.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6094292

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: The emerging consensus that exposure to near-roadway traffic-related pollution causes asthma has implications for compact urban development policies designed to reduce driving and greenhouse gases. OBJECTIVES: We estimated the current burden of childhood asthma-related disease attributable to near-roadway and regional air pollution in Los Angeles County (LAC) and the potential health impact of regional pollution reduction associated with changes in population along major traffic corridors. METHODS: The burden of asthma attributable to the dual effects of near-roadway and regional air pollution was estimated, using nitrogen dioxide and ozone as markers of urban combustion-related and secondary oxidant pollution, respectively. We also estimated the impact of alternative scenarios that assumed a 20% reduction in regional pollution in combination with a 3.6% reduction or 3.6% increase in the proportion of the total population living near major roads, a proxy for near-roadway exposure. RESULTS: We estimated that 27,100 cases of childhood asthma (8% of total) in LAC were at least partly attributable to pollution associated with residential location within 75m of a major road. As a result, a substantial proportion of asthma-related morbidity is a consequence of near-roadway pollution, even if symptoms are triggered by other factors. Benefits resulting from a 20% regional pollution reduction varied markedly depending on the associated change in near-roadway proximity. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that there are large and previously unappreciated public health consequences of air pollution in LAC and probably in other metropolitan areas with dense traffic corridors. To maximize health benefits, compact urban development strategies should be coupled with policies to reduce near-roadway pollution exposure
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Chronic Disease Epidemiology
UniBasel Contributors:Künzli, Nino
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
ISSN:0091-6765
e-ISSN:1552-9924
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article -- Reproduced with permission from Environmental Health Perspectives
Language:English
Identification Number:
Last Modified:31 Aug 2017 09:24
Deposited On:19 Jul 2013 07:41

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