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Interactions between environmental stressors: the influence of salinity on host-parasite interactions between Daphnia magna and Pasteuria ramosa

Hall, Matthew D. and Vettiger, Andrea and Ebert, Dieter. (2013) Interactions between environmental stressors: the influence of salinity on host-parasite interactions between Daphnia magna and Pasteuria ramosa. Oecologia, 171 (4). pp. 789-796.

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Abstract

Interactions between environmental stressors play an important role in shaping the health of an organism. This is particularly true in terms of the prevalence and severity of infectious disease, as stressors in combination will not always act to simply decrease the immune function of a host, but may instead interact to compound or even oppose the influence of parasitism on the health of an organism. Here, we explore the impact of environmental stress on host–parasite interactions using the water flea Daphnia magna and it is obligate parasite Pasteuria ramosa. Utilising an ecologically relevant stressor, we focus on the combined effect of salinity and P. ramosa on the fecundity and survival of the host, as well as on patterns of infectivity and the proliferation of the parasite. We show that in the absence of the parasite, host fecundity and survival was highest in the low salinity treatments. Once a parasite was introduced into the environment, however, salinity and parasitism acted antagonistically to influence both host survival and fecundity, and these patterns of disease were unrelated to infection rates or parasite spore loads. By summarising the form of interactions found in the broader Daphnia literature, we highlight how the combined effect of stress and parasitism will vary with the type of stressor, the trait used to describe the health of Daphnia and the host–parasite combination under observation. Our results highlight how the context-dependent nature of interactions between stress and parasitism inevitably complicates the link between environmental factors and the prevalence and severity of disease.
Faculties and Departments:05 Faculty of Science > Departement Umweltwissenschaften > Zoologie > Evolutionary Biology (Ebert)
UniBasel Contributors:Ebert, Dieter
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0029-8549
e-ISSN:1432-1939
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Language:English
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Last Modified:02 Oct 2017 07:54
Deposited On:21 Jun 2013 12:27

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