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Volume-controlled vs no/short-term drainage after axillary lymph node dissection in breast cancer surgery : a meta-analysis

Droeser, R. A. and Frey, D. M. and Oertli, D. and Kopelman, D. and Baas-Vrancken Peeters, M. J. and Giuliano, A. E. and Dalberg, K. and Kallam, R. and Nordmann, A.. (2009) Volume-controlled vs no/short-term drainage after axillary lymph node dissection in breast cancer surgery : a meta-analysis. The breast : official journal of the European Society of Mastology, Vol. 18. pp. 109-114.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6004364

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Abstract

It is unknown whether there are any clinically relevant differences between volume-controlled (>30-50 ml/24h across trials) vs no/short-term drainage after axillary lymph node dissection in breast cancer surgery on outcomes such as seroma formation, wound infection or length of hospital stay. Randomised controlled trials comparing volume-controlled drainage vs no or short-term drainage after axillary lymph node dissection in breast cancer surgery were identified systematically using Pubmed, EMBASE and The Cochrane library. Trial data were reviewed and extracted independently by two reviewers in a standardised unblinded manner. Six randomised controlled trials which included a total of 561 patients fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Patients randomised to volume-controlled drainage were less likely to develop clinically relevant seromas compared to patients randomised to no/short-term drainage. There was, however, no difference in wound infections between patients treated with volume-controlled drainage and patients with no or short-term drainage. Patients randomised to volume-controlled drainage stayed significantly longer in hospital than patients randomised to no/short-term drainage. Based on available evidence, clinically relevant seromas occur more frequently in patients treated with no/short-term drainage. However, no/short-term drainage after axillary lymph node dissection does not lead to an increase in wound infections and is associated with shorter hospital stay.
Faculties and Departments:03 Faculty of Medicine > Bereich Operative Fächer (Klinik) > Innere Organe > Allgemein- und Viszeralchirurgie (Oertli)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Klinische Forschung > Bereich Operative Fächer (Klinik) > Innere Organe > Allgemein- und Viszeralchirurgie (Oertli)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Klinische Forschung > Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics CEB > Klinische Epidemiologie (Bucher H)
UniBasel Contributors:Oertli, Daniel and Nordmann, Alain J.
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:Churchill Livingstone
ISSN:0960-9776
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
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Last Modified:24 May 2013 09:22
Deposited On:24 May 2013 09:04

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