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First wave of the influenza A/H1N1v pandemic in Switzerland

Nickel, C. H. and Stephan, F. P. and Dangel, M. and Blume, K. and Gehrisch, R. and Dumoulin, A. and Tschudin, S. and Keller, D. I. and Hirsch, H. H. and Widmer, A. F. and Bingisser, R.. (2009) First wave of the influenza A/H1N1v pandemic in Switzerland. Swiss medical weekly : official journal of the Swiss Society of Infectious Diseases, the Swiss Society of Internal Medicine, the Swiss Society of Pneumology, Vol. 139. pp. 731-737.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6003672

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Abstract

AIM: To describe the disease burden, clinical pattern and outcome of influenza-related cases presenting to a Swiss Emergency Department (ED), during the first wave of the 2009 pandemic. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data at the University Hospital of Basel, Switzerland. All patients presenting to the ED with influenza-like symptoms from June 1 to October 23, 2009, were studied. Rate of hospitalisation, demographic characteristics, symptoms, microbiological diagnoses and complications of influenza infection were analysed. RESULTS: One tenth (808 of 8356 patients) of all non-trauma ED presentations, during the study period, were a result of suspected influenza-related illness. Influenza A/H1N1v infection accounted for 5% of these presentations. Patients aged 50 years or less accounted for 87% of these presentations and for 100% of A/H1N1v infection. The highest detection rate of A/H1N1v-infection occurred in July, and the highest rate of clinical presentations occurred in August 2009. Underlying medical disease was observed in 14% of all patients. The presence of fever, cough and myalgia was the prime clinical predictor for the presence of A/H1N1v infection. 16% of patients with this triad suffered from A/H1N1v. CONCLUSION: Suspected A/H1N1v infection contributed to a considerable health care burden in Switzerland. However, the rate of true positivity was low (5%), hospitalisations rare (5%), and mortality did not occur. Therefore, the first wave of the A/H1N1v pandemic in Switzerland was rather media "hype" than real threat.
Faculties and Departments:03 Faculty of Medicine > Bereich Medizinische Fächer (Klinik) > Ehemalige Einheiten Medizinische Fächer (Klinik) > Stationäre innere Medizin (Schifferli)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Klinische Forschung > Bereich Medizinische Fächer (Klinik) > Ehemalige Einheiten Medizinische Fächer (Klinik) > Stationäre innere Medizin (Schifferli)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Bereich Medizinische Fächer (Klinik) > Infektiologie > Infektiologie (Battegay M)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Klinische Forschung > Bereich Medizinische Fächer (Klinik) > Infektiologie > Infektiologie (Battegay M)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Biomedizin > Division of Medical Microbiology > Transplantation Virology (Hirsch)
UniBasel Contributors:Hirsch, Hans H. and Widmer, Andreas F.-X. and Bingisser, Roland M. and Keller, Dagmar Iris and Tschudin Sutter, Sarah
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:EMH
ISSN:1424-7860
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
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Last Modified:23 May 2014 08:34
Deposited On:01 Mar 2013 11:09

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