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The regional network for Asian schistosomiasis and other helminth zoonoses (RNAS+) : target diseases in face of climate change

Yang, G. J. and Utzinger, J. and Lv, S. and Qian, Y. J. and Li, S. Z. and Wang, Q. and Bergquist, R. and Vounatsou, P. and Li, W. and Yang, K. and Zhou, X. N.. (2010) The regional network for Asian schistosomiasis and other helminth zoonoses (RNAS+) : target diseases in face of climate change. Advances in parasitology, Vol. 73. pp. 101-135.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A5843048

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Abstract

Climate change-according to conventional wisdom-will result in an expansion of tropical parasitic diseases in terms of latitude and altitude, with vector-borne diseases particularly prone to change. However, although a significant rise in temperature occurred over the past century, there is little empirical evidence whether climate change has indeed favoured infectious diseases. This might be explained by the complex relationship between climate change and the frequency and the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases, which is characterised by nonlinear associations and countless other complex factors governing the distribution of infectious diseases. Here, we explore whether and how climate change might impact on diseases targeted by the Regional Network for Asian Schistosomiasis and Other Helminth Zoonoses (RNAS(+)). We start our review with a short summary of the current evidence-base how climate change affects the distribution of infectious diseases. Next, we introduce biology-based models for predicting the distribution of infectious diseases in a future, warmer world. Two case studies are presented: the classical RNAS(+) disease schistosomiasis and an emerging disease, angiostrongyliasis, focussing on their occurrences in the People's Republic of China. Strengths and limitations of current models for predicting the impact of climate change on infectious diseases are discussed, and we propose model extensions to include social and ecological factors. Finally, we recommend that mitigation and adaptation strategies to diminish potential negative effects of climate change need to be developed in concert with key stakeholders so that surveillance and early-warning systems can be strengthened and the most vulnerable population groups protected
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Infectious Disease Modelling > Infectious Disease Modelling (Smith)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Eco System Health Sciences > Health Impact Assessment (Utzinger)
UniBasel Contributors:Vounatsou, Penelope and Utzinger, Jürg
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0065-308X
Note:Also published in: Important helminth infections in southeast Asia. - Amsterdam : Elsevier. - Part B, S. S. 101-135 -- Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
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Last Modified:09 Jan 2015 09:25
Deposited On:14 Sep 2012 06:51

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