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"Bright side" and "dark side" hypomania are associated with differences in psychological functioning, sleep and physical activity in a non-clinical sample of young adults

Brand, Serge and Gerber, Markus and Pühse, Uwe and Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith. (2011) "Bright side" and "dark side" hypomania are associated with differences in psychological functioning, sleep and physical activity in a non-clinical sample of young adults. Journal of affective disorders, Vol. 131, H. 1/3. pp. 68-78.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A5843540

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: No research has yet focused on hypomanic states in non-clinical early adult populations. The aim of the present study was therefore to assess hypomania in a large non-clinical sample of young adults. METHODS: A total of 862 participants (639 females and 223 males; mean age: M=24.67; SD=5.91) took part in the study. They completed a series of validated self-report questionnaires assessing hypomania (HCL-32) and other aspects of psychological functioning, sleep, stress, quality of life, cognitive-emotional elaboration of pain, self-efficacy, and physical activity. RESULTS: Based on the HCL-32, 19% of the participants (n=169) were categorized as currently being in a hypomanic state. Of those, 57.6% were classified as "active/elated" ('bright side'), whereas 42.4% were classified as "irritable/risk-taking" ('dark side'). Compared to non-hypomanic participants and the 'bright side' group, 'dark side' hypomanic participants reported more depressive symptoms, sleep disturbances, somatic complaints, perceived stress, negative coping strategies, and lower self-efficacy. By contrast, 'bright side' hypomanic participants had lower stress scores, more positive self-instructions, and higher levels of exploration, self-efficacy, and physical activity. LIMITATIONS: A cross-sectional design was adopted, assessing university students, who may not be representative of the stage of early adulthood. CONCLUSIONS: The present results underscore the notion of a continuity between a mood state and both favorable ('bright side') and unfavorable ('dark side') hypomanic states. In early adulthood, 'bright' and 'dark side' hypomania differs with respect to physical activity, psychological functioning and sleep.
Faculties and Departments:03 Faculty of Medicine > Bereich Psychiatrie (Klinik) > Erwachsenenpsychiatrie UPK > Klinische Stress- und Traumaforschung (Holsboer-Trachsler)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Klinische Forschung > Bereich Psychiatrie (Klinik) > Erwachsenenpsychiatrie UPK > Klinische Stress- und Traumaforschung (Holsboer-Trachsler)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Sport, Bewegung und Gesundheit > Bereich Sportwissenschaft > Sportwissenschaften (Pühse)
UniBasel Contributors:Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith and Pühse, Uwe and Gerber, Markus and Brand, Serge
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0165-0327
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
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Last Modified:03 Jul 2015 08:53
Deposited On:08 Jun 2012 06:41

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