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Repeated mass distributions and continuous distribution of long-lasting insecticidal nets : modelling sustainability of health benefits from mosquito nets, depending on case management

Briët, Olivier Jt and Penny, Melissa A.. (2013) Repeated mass distributions and continuous distribution of long-lasting insecticidal nets : modelling sustainability of health benefits from mosquito nets, depending on case management. Malaria journal, Vol. 12 , 401.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6194623

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Abstract

Stagnating funds for malaria control have spurred interest in the question of how to sustain the gains of recent successes with long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) and improved case management (CM). This simulation study examined the malaria transmission and disease dynamics in scenarios with sustained LLINs and CM interventions and tried to determine optimal LLIN distribution rates. The effects of abruptly halting LLIN distribution were also examined.; Dynamic simulations of malaria in humans and mosquitoes were run on the OpenMalaria platform, using stochastic individual-based simulation models. LLINs were distributed in a range of transmission settings, with varying CM coverage levels.; In the short-term, LLINs were beneficial over the entire transmission spectrum, reducing both transmission and disease burden. In the long-term, repeated distributions sustainably reduced transmission in all settings. However, because of the resulting reduction in acquired immunity in the population, the malaria disease burden, after initially being reduced, gradually increased and eventually stabilized at a new level. This new level was higher than the pre-intervention level in previously high transmission settings, if there is a maximum disease burden in the relationship between transmission and disease burden at intermediate transmission levels. This result could lead one to conclude that sustained LLIN distribution might not be cost-effective in high transmission settings in the long term. However, improved CM rendered LLINs more cost-effective in higher transmission settings than in those without improved CM and the majority of the African population lives in areas where CM and LLINs are sustainably combined. The effects of changes in LLIN distribution rate on cost-effectiveness were relatively small compared to the effects of changes in transmission setting and CM. Abruptly halting LLIN distribution led to temporary morbidity peaks, which were particularly large in low to intermediate transmission settings.; This study reaffirms the importance of context specific intervention planning. Intervention planning must include combinations of malaria vector control and CM, and must consider both the pre-intervention transmission level and the intervention history to account for the loss of immunity and the potential for rebounds in disease burden.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Health Systems Research and Dynamic Modelling > Dynamical Modelling (Smith)
UniBasel Contributors:Briët, Olivier
Item Type:Article, refereed
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1475-2875
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
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Last Modified:31 Jan 2014 09:49
Deposited On:31 Jan 2014 09:49

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