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Association between allergic sensitization and intestinal parasite infection in schoolchildren in Gqeberha, South Africa

Brandt, Oliver and Wegenstein, Benjamin and Müller, Ivan and Smith, Danielle and Nqweniso, Siphesihle and Adams, Larissa and Müller, Simon and du Randt, Rosa and Pühse, Uwe and Gerber, Markus and Navarini, Alexander A. and Utzinger, Jürg and Labhardt, Niklaus Daniel and Schindler, Christian and Walter, Cheryl. (2022) Association between allergic sensitization and intestinal parasite infection in schoolchildren in Gqeberha, South Africa. Clinical & Experimental Allergy. p. 1.

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Official URL: https://edoc.unibas.ch/87417/

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Abstract

Background Inconsistent data exist regarding the influence of parasitic infection on the prevalence of allergic sensitization and disorders. Objective To investigate the impact of geohelminth and protozoan infections on sensitization patterns and allergic symptoms of children living in low-income communities in Gqeberha, South Africa. Methods In a cross-sectional study, 587 school children aged 8-12 years were recruited in June 2016 and screened for reactivity to common allergens by skin prick tests and for parasitic infections by stool tests. Additionally, questionnaires were completed to record allergic symptoms the children may have experienced. Results Positive SPT were found in 237/587 children (40.4%), about one third of whom were polysensitized. Sensitizations were most frequently detected against the house dust mites (HDM) Dermatophagoides spp . (31.9%) and Blomia tropicalis (21.0%). Infections with geohelminths ( Ascaris lumbricoides , Trichuris trichiura ) were found in 26.8% and protozoan infections ( Gardia lamblia , Cryptosporidia spp .) in 13.9% of study participants. Mixed logistic regression analyses revealed negative associations between parasite infection and sensitization to Blomia tropicalis (OR: 0.54, 95%CI 0.33-0.89) and to Dermatophagoides spp . (OR 0.65, 95%CI 0.43-0.96), and between protozoan infection and allergic sensitization to any aeroallergen, although these associations were not significant when adjusted for false discovery. Geohelminth infection and intensity of geohelminth infection were both associated with reduced risk of polysensitization (OR 0.41, 95%CI 0.21-0.86), and this association remained significant with adjustment for false discovery. Reported respiratory symptoms were associated with HDM sensitization (ORs from 1.54 to 2.48), but not with parasite infection. Conclusions and clinical relevance Our data suggest that geohelminth infection and high geohelminth infection intensity are associated with a reduced risk of polysensitization.
Faculties and Departments:03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Sport, Bewegung und Gesundheit > Bereich Sportwissenschaft > Sportwissenschaften (Pühse)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Former Units within Swiss TPH > Health Impact Assessment (Utzinger)
UniBasel Contributors:Brandt, Oliver and Wegenstein, Benjamin and Müller, Ivan and Müller, Simon and Pühse, Uwe and Gerber, Markus and Utzinger, Jürg and Labhardt, Niklaus and Schindler, Christian
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:Wiley
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
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Last Modified:26 Jan 2022 18:25
Deposited On:26 Jan 2022 18:25

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