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Does normal developmental expression of psychosis combine with environmental risk to cause persistence of psychosis? : a psychosis proneness- persistence model

Cougnard, A. and Marcelis, M. and Myin-Germeys, I. and de Graaf, R. and Vollebergh, W. and Krabbendam, L. and Lieb, R. and Wittchen, H.-U. and Henquet, C. and Spauwen, J. and van Os, J.. (2007) Does normal developmental expression of psychosis combine with environmental risk to cause persistence of psychosis? : a psychosis proneness- persistence model. Psychological medicine, Vol. 37, H. 4. pp. 513-527.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A5253176

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Abstract

Background. Research suggests that low-grade psychotic experiences in the general population are a common but transitory developmental phenomenon. Using two independent general population samples, the hypothesis was examined that common, non-clinical developmental expression of psychosis may become abnormally persistent when synergistically combined with developmental exposures that may impact on behavioural and neurotransmitter sensitization such as cannabis, trauma and urbanicity. Method. The amount of synergism was estimated from the additive statistical interaction between baseline cannabis use, childhood trauma and urbanicity on the one hand, and baseline psychotic experiences on the other, in predicting 3-year follow-up psychotic experiences, using data from two large. longitudinal, random population samples from the Netherlands [The Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS)] and Germany [The Early Developmental Stages of Psychopathology (EDSP) study]. Results. The 3-year persistence rates of psychotic experiences were low at 26% in NEMESIS and 31% in EDSP. However, persistence rates were progressively higher with greater baseline number of environmental exposures in predicting follow-up psychotic experiences (chi(2)=6.9, df=1, p=0009 in NEMESIS and chi(2)=4.2, df=1, p=0.04 in EDSP). Between 21% and 83% (NEMESIS) and 29% and 51% (EDSP) of the subjects exposed to both environmental exposures and psychotic experiences at baseline had persistence of psychotic experiences at follow-up because of the synergistic action of the two factors. Conclusion. The findings suggest that environmental risks for psychosis act additively, and that the level of environmental risk combines synergistically with non-clinical developmental expression of psychosis to cause abnormal persistence and, eventually, need for care.
Faculties and Departments:07 Faculty of Psychology > Departement Psychologie > Forschungsbereich Klinische Psychologie und Neurowissenschaften > Klinische Psychologie und Epidemiologie (Lieb)
UniBasel Contributors:Lieb, Roselind
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:0033-2917
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Last Modified:22 Mar 2012 14:25
Deposited On:22 Mar 2012 13:43

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