edoc

The biodiversity-N cycle relationship: a(15)N tracer experiment with soil from plant mixtures of varying diversity to model N pool sizes and transformation rates

Lama, Soni and Kuhn, Thomas and Lehmann, Moritz F. and Müller, Christoph and Gonzalez, Odette and Eisenhauer, Nico and Lange, Markus and Scheu, Stefan and Oelmann, Yvonne and Wilcke, Wolfgang. (2020) The biodiversity-N cycle relationship: a(15)N tracer experiment with soil from plant mixtures of varying diversity to model N pool sizes and transformation rates. Biology and Fertility of Soils, 56 (7). pp. 1047-1061.

Full text not available from this repository.

Official URL: https://edoc.unibas.ch/80348/

Downloads: Statistics Overview

Abstract

We conducted a(15)N tracer experiment in laboratory microcosms with field-fresh soil samples from a biodiversity experiment to evaluate the relationship between grassland biodiversity and N cycling. To embrace the complexity of the N cycle, we determined N exchange between five soil N pools (labile and recalcitrant organic N, dissolved NH(4)(+)and NO(3)(-)in soil solution, and exchangeable NH4+) and eight N transformations (gross N mineralization from labile and recalcitrant organic N, NH(4)(+)immobilization into labile and recalcitrant organic N, autotrophic nitrification, heterotrophic nitrification, NO(3)(-)immobilization, adsorption of NH4+) expected in aerobic soils with the help of the N-cycle modelNtrace. We used grassland soil of the Jena Experiment, which includes plant mixtures with 1 to 60 species and 1 to 4 functional groups (legumes, grasses, tall herbs, small herbs). The 19 soil samples of one block of the Jena Experiment were labeled with either(15)NH(4)(+)or(15)NO(3)(-)or both. In the presence of legumes, gross N mineralization and autotrophic nitrification increased significantly because of higher soil N concentrations in legume-containing plots and high microbial activity. Similarly, the presence of grasses significantly increased the soil NH(4)(+)pool, gross N mineralization, and NH(4)(+)immobilization, likely because of enhanced microbial biomass and activity by providing large amounts of rhizodeposits through their dense root systems. In our experiment, previously reported plant species richness effects on the N cycle, observed in a larger-scale field experiment within the Jena Experiment, were not seen. However, specific plant functional groups had a significant positive impact on the N cycling in the incubated soil samples.
Faculties and Departments:05 Faculty of Science > Departement Umweltwissenschaften > Geowissenschaften > Geochemie Stoffkreisläufe (Lehmann)
UniBasel Contributors:Lehmann, Moritz F
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0178-2762
e-ISSN:1432-0789
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Identification Number:
Last Modified:14 Apr 2021 10:32
Deposited On:14 Apr 2021 10:32

Repository Staff Only: item control page