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Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and residual symptoms after cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT): a randomized controlled trial

Kulz, Anne Katrin and Landmann, Sarah and Cludius, Barbara and Rose, Nina and Heidenreich, Thomas and Jelinek, Lena and Alsleben, Heike and Wahl, Karina and Philipsen, Alexandra and Voderholzer, Ulrich and Maier, Jonathan G. and Moritz, Steffen. (2018) Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and residual symptoms after cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT): a randomized controlled trial. European archives of psychiatry and clinical neuroscience (269). pp. 223-233.

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Official URL: https://edoc.unibas.ch/73191/

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Abstract

Up to one-third of individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) do not benefit from evidence-based psychotherapy. We examined the efficacy of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) as a complementary treatment option. In a prospective, bicentric, assessor-blinded, randomized, and actively controlled clinical trial, 125 patients with OCD and residual symptoms after cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) were randomized to either an MBCT group (n=61) or to a psychoeducational group (OCD-EP; n=64) as an active control condition. At post-treatment, there was no significant benefit of MBCT over OCD-EP with the Yale-Brown-Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) as the primary outcome measure, but with the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory [OCI-R; F(1, 101)=5.679, p=.036, effect size eta2partial=0.053]. Moreover, the response rate and the improvement on secondary outcomes such as obsessive beliefs and quality of life was significantly larger in the MBCT group. Non-completion rates were below 10%. At the 6-month follow-up, OC symptoms were further improved in both groups; group differences were no longer significant. Our findings suggest that MBCT, compared to a psychoeducational program, leads to accelerated improvement of self-reported OC symptoms and secondary outcomes, but not of clinician-rated OC symptoms. In the midterm, both interventions yield similar and stable, but small improvements, suggesting that additional treatment options may be necessary.
Faculties and Departments:07 Faculty of Psychology > Departement Psychologie > Forschungsbereich Klinische Psychologie und Neurowissenschaften > Klinische Psychologie und Epidemiologie (Lieb)
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
ISSN:1433-8491
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
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Last Modified:06 Apr 2020 10:54
Deposited On:06 Apr 2020 10:54

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