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Peripheral neuropathy in patients with human immunodeficiency viral infection at a tertiary hospital in Ghana

Puplampu, Peter and Ganu, Vincent and Kenu, Ernest and Kudzi, William and Adjei, Patrick and Grize, Leticia and Käser, Michael. (2019) Peripheral neuropathy in patients with human immunodeficiency viral infection at a tertiary hospital in Ghana. Journal of neurovirology, 25 (4). pp. 464-474.

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Abstract

Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is the most frequent neurological complication in people living with HIV/AIDS. Neurological damage was identified to not only be caused by the viral infection itself but also through neurotoxic antiretroviral therapy (ART). PN is associated with a variety of risk factors; however, detailed knowledge is scarce for sub-Saharan African populations, bearing among the highest HIV/AIDS infection burden.In a cross-sectional study, we assessed the prevalence of PN in 525 adult outpatients suffering from HIV/AIDS and admitted to the largest tertiary hospital in Ghana. Through a detailed questionnaire and clinical examination including neurologic assessment and laboratory blood sample testing, this study investigated associations of PN with demographic and health determinants and identified risk factors associated with sensory neuropathy.The prevalence of PN in the Ghanaian cohort was 17.7% and increased odd ratios (OR) when patients were taller (> 1.57 m; OR = 3.84; 95% CI 1.38-10.66) or reached the age > 34 years (p = 0.124). Respondents with longer education duration had significantly less PN (≥ 9 years of education; OR = 0.49; 95% CI 0.26-0.92). The study also identified significant association of PN to both waist and hip girth and neutrophil counts. Curiously, higher adjusted odd ratios (aOR) of PN of patients under ART treatment were observed when CD4 lymphocytes were elevated (aOR = 0.81; 95% CI 0.36-1.83 and aOR = 2.17; 95% CI 0.93-5.05, for 300 and 600 counts, respectively). For patients on ART, an increase of 10 CD4 cell count units increased their chance of developing PN by 1% (aOR = 1.01; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.03).Despite current drug application regulations, prevalence of PN is still unacceptably high in sub-Saharan African populations. Reduction in chronic morbidity through a health system with routine monitoring, early diagnosis and prompt intervention, and effective case management can improve people living with HIV/AIDS' quality of life.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Biostatistics > Biostatistics Frequentist Modelling
UniBasel Contributors:Grize, Leticia and Käser, Michael
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1538-2443
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Language:English
Identification Number:
Last Modified:30 Sep 2019 07:34
Deposited On:30 Sep 2019 07:34

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