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The temporal dynamics and infectiousness of subpatent Plasmodium falciparum infections in relation to parasite density

Slater, Hannah C. and Ross, Amanda and Felger, Ingrid and Hofmann, Natalie E. and Robinson, Leanne and Cook, Jackie and Gonçalves, Bronner P. and Björkman, Anders and Ouedraogo, Andre Lin and Morris, Ulrika and Msellem, Mwinyi and Koepfli, Cristian and Mueller, Ivo and Tadesse, Fitsum and Gadisa, Endalamaw and Das, Smita and Domingo, Gonzalo and Kapulu, Melissa and Midega, Janet and Owusu-Agyei, Seth and Nabet, Cécile and Piarroux, Renaud and Doumbo, Ogobara and Doumbo, Safiatou Niare and Koram, Kwadwo and Lucchi, Naomi and Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam and Mosha, Jacklin and Tiono, Alfred and Chandramohan, Daniel and Gosling, Roly and Mwingira, Felista and Sauerwein, Robert and Riley, Eleanor M. and White, Nicholas J. and Nosten, Francois and Imwong, Mallika and Bousema, Teun and Drakeley, Chris and Okell, Lucy C.. (2019) The temporal dynamics and infectiousness of subpatent Plasmodium falciparum infections in relation to parasite density. Nature Communications, 10. p. 1433.

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Abstract

Malaria infections occurring below the limit of detection of standard diagnostics are common in all endemic settings. However, key questions remain surrounding their contribution to sustaining transmission and whether they need to be detected and targeted to achieve malaria elimination. In this study we analyse a range of malaria datasets to quantify the density, detectability, course of infection and infectiousness of subpatent infections. Asymptomatically infected individuals have lower parasite densities on average in low transmission settings compared to individuals in higher transmission settings. In cohort studies, subpatent infections are found to be predictive of future periods of patent infection and in membrane feeding studies, individuals infected with subpatent asexual parasite densities are found to be approximately a third as infectious to mosquitoes as individuals with patent (asexual parasite) infection. These results indicate that subpatent infections contribute to the infectious reservoir, may be long lasting, and require more sensitive diagnostics to detect them in lower transmission settings.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Biostatistics > Biostatistics - Frequency Modelling (Schindler)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Medical Parasitology and Infection Biology > Molecular Diagnostics (Felger)
UniBasel Contributors:Ross, Amanda and Felger, Ingrid and Hofmann, Natalie
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
e-ISSN:2041-1723
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Language:English
Identification Number:
Last Modified:04 Apr 2019 13:54
Deposited On:04 Apr 2019 13:54

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