edoc

How do Indirect Measures of Evaluation Work? Evaluating the Inference of Prejudice in the Implicit Association Test

Brendl, C. Miguel and Markman, Arthur B. and Messner, Claude . (2001) How do Indirect Measures of Evaluation Work? Evaluating the Inference of Prejudice in the Implicit Association Test. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 81 (5). pp. 760-773.

Full text not available from this repository.

Official URL: https://edoc.unibas.ch/68470/

Downloads: Statistics Overview

Abstract

There has been significant interest in indirect measures of attitudes like the Implicit Association Test (IAT), presumably because of the possibility of uncovering implicit prejudices. The authors derived a set of qualitative predictions for people's performance in the IAT on the basis of random walk models. These were supported in 3 experiments comparing clearly positive or negative categories to nonwords. They also provided evidence that participants shift their response criterion when doing the IAT. Because of these criterion shifts, a response pattern in the IAT can have multiple causes. Thus, it is not possible to infer a single cause (such as prejudice) from IAT results. A surprising additional result was that nonwords were treated as though they were evaluated more negatively than obviously negative items like insects, suggesting that low familiarity items may generate the pattern of data previously interpreted as evidence for implicit prejudice.
Faculties and Departments:06 Faculty of Business and Economics > Departement Wirtschaftswissenschaften > Professuren Wirtschaftswissenschaften > Marketing (Brendl)
UniBasel Contributors:Brendl, C. Miguel
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:American Psychological Association
ISSN:0022-3514
e-ISSN:1939-1315
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Related URLs:
Last Modified:17 Jan 2019 16:30
Deposited On:17 Jan 2019 16:30

Repository Staff Only: item control page