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Biology of two larval morphological phenotypes of Aedes aegypti in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire

Guindo-Coulibaly, N. and Diakite, N. R. and Adja, A. M. and Coulibaly, J. T. and Bassa, K. F. and Konan, Y. L. and N'Goran, K. E.. (2018) Biology of two larval morphological phenotypes of Aedes aegypti in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire. Bulletin of Entomological Research , 108 (4). pp. 540-546.

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Official URL: https://edoc.unibas.ch/68249/

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Abstract

Since 2008, several outbreaks of yellow fever and dengue occurred in Abidjan, the economic capital of Côte d'Ivoire. A better knowledge of the biology of Aedes aegypti populations, the main vector of yellow fever and dengue viruses, is necessary to tailor vector control strategies implemented in the city. This study was designed to determine some biological parameters, occurring during the life cycle of two morphological phenotypes of Ae. aegypti larvae. Mosquitoes were sampled in a suburb of Abidjan (Treichville) using the WHO layer-traps technique. Biological parameters were studied in laboratory under standard conditions of temperature (27°C ± 2°C) and relative humidity (80% ± 10%). Our results indicated that the mean eggs laid by females from 'brown larvae' (BL) (85.95, 95% confidence interval (CI 95%) 78.87-93.02) was higher than those from 'white larvae' (WL) (64.40%, CI 95% 55.27-73.54). The gonotrophic cycle was 3 and 4 days in females from BL and WL, respectively. The overall yield of breeding mosquitoes from BL (63.88%, CI 95% 62.61-65.14) was higher compared with those of mosquitoes from WL (59.73%, CI 95% 58.35-61.12). The sex ratio (male/female) was 0.95 and 1.68 in Ae. aegypti populations from BL and WL, respectively. Females from BL lived slightly longer than those from WL (t = -2.332; P = 0.021). This study shows that Ae. Aegypti populations from BL and WL present different biological parameters during their life cycle. This could have an implication on their ability to transmit human disease viruses such as dengue and yellow fever. Further molecular studies are needed to determine genetic divergence between these Ae. aegypti populations.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Medical Parasitology and Infection Biology > Helminth Drug Development (Keiser)
UniBasel Contributors:Coulibaly, Jean
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:0007-4853
e-ISSN:1475-2670
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Identification Number:
Last Modified:29 Jan 2019 15:37
Deposited On:29 Jan 2019 15:37

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