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Risk factors for detection, survival, and growth of antibiotic-resistant and pathogenic Escherichia coli in household soils in rural Bangladesh

Montealegre, Maria Camila and Roy, Subarna and Böni, Franziska and Hossain, Muhammed Iqbal and Navab-Daneshmand, Tala and Caduff, Lea and Faruque, A. S. G. and Islam, Mohammad Aminul and Julian, Timothy R.. (2018) Risk factors for detection, survival, and growth of antibiotic-resistant and pathogenic Escherichia coli in household soils in rural Bangladesh. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 84 (24). e01978-18.

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Abstract

Soils in household environments in low- and middle-income countries may play an important role in the persistence, proliferation, and transmission of; Escherichia coli; Our goal was to investigate the risk factors for detection, survival, and growth of; E. coli; in soils collected from household plots.; E. coli; was enumerated in soil and fecal samples from humans, chickens, and cattle from 52 households in rural Bangladesh. Associations between; E. coli; concentrations in soil, household-level risk factors, and soil physicochemical characteristics were investigated. Susceptibility to 16 antibiotics and the presence of intestinal pathotypes were evaluated for 175; E. coli; isolates. The growth and survival of; E. coli; in microcosms using soil collected from the households were also assessed.; E. coli; was isolated from 44.2% of the soil samples, with an average of 1.95 log; 10; CFU/g dry soil. Soil moisture and clay content were associated with; E. coli; concentrations in soil, whereas no household-level risk factor was significantly correlated. Antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity were common among; E. coli; isolates, with 42.3% resistant to at least one antibiotic, 12.6% multidrug resistant (≥3 classes), and 10% potentially pathogenic. Soil microcosms demonstrate growth and/or survival of; E. coli; , including an enteropathogenic extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing isolate, in some, but not all, of the household soils tested. In rural Bangladesh, defined soil physicochemical characteristics appear more influential for; E. coli; detection in soils than household-level risk factors. Soils may act as reservoirs in the transmission of antibiotic-resistant and potentially pathogenic; E. coli; and therefore may impact the effectiveness of water, sanitation, and hygiene interventions.; IMPORTANCE; Soil may represent a direct source or act as an intermediary for the transmission of antibiotic-resistant and pathogenic; Escherichia coli; strains, particularly in low-income and rural settings. Thus, determining risk factors associated with detection, growth, and long-term survival of; E. coli; in soil environments is important for public health. Here, we demonstrate that household soils in rural Bangladesh are reservoirs for antibiotic-resistant and potentially pathogenic; E. coli; strains and can support; E. coli; growth and survival, and defined soil physicochemical characteristics are drivers of; E. coli; survival in this environment. In contrast, we found no evidence that household-level factors, including water, sanitation, and hygiene indicators, were associated with; E. coli; contamination of household soils.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Eco System Health Sciences > Ecosystem Services, Climate & Health (Cissé)
UniBasel Contributors:Julian, Timothy
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:American Society for Microbiology
ISSN:0099-2240
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Language:English
Identification Number:
Last Modified:29 Jan 2019 14:18
Deposited On:29 Jan 2019 14:18

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