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China's tuberculosis epidemic stems from historical expansion of four strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

Liu, Qingyun and Ma, Aijing and Wei, Lanhai and Pang, Yu and Wu, Beibei and Luo, Tao and Zhou, Yang and Zheng, Hong-Xiang and Jiang, Qi and Gan, Mingyu and Zuo, Tianyu and Liu, Mei and Yang, Chongguang and Jin, Li and Comas, Iñaki and Gagneux, Sebastien and Zhao, Yanlin and Pepperell, Caitlin S. and Gao, Qian. (2018) China's tuberculosis epidemic stems from historical expansion of four strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Nature ecology & evolution, 2 (12). pp. 1982-1992.

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Official URL: https://edoc.unibas.ch/67925/

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Abstract

A small number of high-burden countries account for the majority of tuberculosis cases worldwide. Detailed data are lacking from these regions. To explore the evolutionary history of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in China-the country with the third highest tuberculosis burden-we analysed a countrywide collection of 4,578 isolates. Little genetic diversity was detected, with 99.4% of the bacterial population belonging to lineage 2 and three sublineages of lineage 4. The deeply rooted phylogenetic positions and geographic restriction of these four genotypes indicate that their populations expanded in situ following a small number of introductions to China. Coalescent analyses suggest that these bacterial subpopulations emerged in China around 1,000 years ago, and expanded in parallel from the twelfth century onwards, and that the whole population peaked in the late eighteenth century. More recently, sublineage L2.3, which is indigenous to China and exhibited relatively high transmissibility and extensive global dissemination, came to dominate the population dynamics of M. tuberculosis in China. Our results indicate that historical expansion of four M. tuberculosis strains shaped the current tuberculosis epidemic in China, and highlight the long-term genetic continuity of the indigenous M. tuberculosis population.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Medical Parasitology and Infection Biology (MPI) > Tuberculosis Research (Gagneux)
UniBasel Contributors:Gagneux, Sebastien
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:2397-334X
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Identification Number:
Last Modified:15 Jan 2019 14:20
Deposited On:15 Jan 2019 14:20

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