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Loss of genomic diversity in a Neisseria meningitidis clone through a colonization bottleneck

Lamelas, Araceli and Hamid, Abdul-Wahab M. and Dangy, Jean-Pierre and Hauser, Julia and Jud, Maja and Röltgen, Katharina and Hodgson, Abraham and Junghanss, Thomas and Harris, Simon R. and Parkhill, Julian and Bentley, Stephen D. and Pluschke, Gerd. (2018) Loss of genomic diversity in a Neisseria meningitidis clone through a colonization bottleneck. Genome biology and evolution, 10 (8). pp. 2102-2109.

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Official URL: https://edoc.unibas.ch/65670/

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Abstract

Neisseria meningitidis is the leading cause of epidemic meningitis in the "meningitis belt" of Africa, where clonal waves of colonization and disease are observed. Point mutations and horizontal gene exchange lead to constant diversification of meningococcal populations during clonal spread. Maintaining a high genomic diversity may be an evolutionary strategy of meningococci that increases chances of fixing occasionally new highly successful "fit genotypes". We have performed a longitudinal study of meningococcal carriage and disease in northern Ghana by analyzing cerebrospinal fluid samples from all suspected meningitis cases and monitoring carriage of meningococci by twice yearly colonization surveys. In the framework of this study, we observed complete replacement of an A: sequence types (ST)-2859 clone by a W: ST-2881 clone. However, after a gap of 1 year, A: ST-2859 meningococci re-emerged both as colonizer and meningitis causing agent. Our whole genome sequencing analyses compared the A population isolated prior to the W colonization and disease wave with the re-emerging A meningococci. This analysis revealed expansion of one clone differing in only one nonsynonymous SNP from several isolates already present in the original A: ST-2859 population. The colonization bottleneck caused by the competing W meningococci thus resulted in a profound reduction in genomic diversity of the A meningococcal population.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Medical Parasitology and Infection Biology > Molecular Immunology (Pluschke)
UniBasel Contributors:Lamelas Cabello, Araceli and Dangy, Jean-Pierre and Hauser, Julia and Pluschke, Gerd and Röltgen, Katharina
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1759-6653
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Identification Number:
Last Modified:15 Nov 2018 13:31
Deposited On:15 Nov 2018 13:31

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