edoc

Calmodulin-binding transcription activator 1 (CAMTA1) alleles predispose human episodic memory performance

Huentelman, Matthew J. and Papassotiropoulos, Andreas and Craig, David W. and Hoerndli, Frederic J. and Pearson, John V. and Huynh, Kim-Dung and Corneveaux, Jason and Hänggi, Jürgen and Mondadori, Christian R. A. and Buchmann, Andreas and Reiman, Eric M. and Henke, Katharina and de Quervain, Dominique J.-F. and Stephan, Dietrich A.. (2007) Calmodulin-binding transcription activator 1 (CAMTA1) alleles predispose human episodic memory performance. Human Molecular Genetics, 16 (12). pp. 1469-1477.

Full text not available from this repository.

Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A5254574

Downloads: Statistics Overview

Abstract

Little is known about the genes and proteins involved in the process of human memory. To identify genetic factors related to human episodic memory performance, we conducted an ultra-high-density genome-wide screen at < 500 000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a sample of normal young adults stratified for performance on an episodic recall memory test. Analysis of this data identified SNPs within the calmodulin-binding transcription activator 1 (CAMTA1) gene that were significantly associated with memory performance. A follow up study, focused on the CAMTA1 locus in an independent cohort consisting of cognitively normal young adults, singled out SNP rs4908449 with a P-value of 0.0002 as the most significant associated SNP in the region. These validated genetic findings were further supported by the identification of CAMTA1 transcript enrichment in memory-related human brain regions and through a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment on individuals matched for memory performance that identified CAMTA1 allele-specific upregulation of medial temporal lobe brain activity in those individuals harboring the 'at-risk' allele for poorer memory performance. The CAMTA1 locus encodes a purported transcription factor that interfaces with the calcium-calmodulin system of the cell to alter gene expression patterns. Our validated genomic and functional biological findings described herein suggest a role for CAMTA1 in human episodic memory.
Faculties and Departments:05 Faculty of Science > Departement Biozentrum > Services Biozentrum > Life Sciences Training Facility (Papassotiropoulos)
07 Faculty of Psychology > Departement Psychologie > Forschungsbereich Klinische Psychologie und Neurowissenschaften > Molecular Psychology (Papassotiropoulos)
UniBasel Contributors:Papassotiropoulos, Andreas and de Quervain, Dominique J.-F.
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0964-6906
e-ISSN:1460-2083
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Identification Number:
Last Modified:22 Mar 2018 14:17
Deposited On:22 Mar 2012 13:34

Repository Staff Only: item control page