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Epidemiology of intestinal parasite infections in three departments of south-central Côte d’Ivoire before the implementation of a cluster-randomised trial

Coulibaly, G. Ouattara and Dongo, K. and Hürlimann, E. and Bassa, F. K. and Koné, N. and Essé, C. and Yapi, R. B. and Bonfoh, B. and Utzinger, J. and Raso, G. and N'Goran, E. K.. (2018) Epidemiology of intestinal parasite infections in three departments of south-central Côte d’Ivoire before the implementation of a cluster-randomised trial. Parasite Epidemiology and Control , 3 (2). pp. 63-76.

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Abstract

Hundreds of millions of people are infected with helminths and intestinal protozoa, particularly children in low- and middle-income countries. Preventive chemotherapy is the main strategy to control helminthiases. However, rapid re-infection occurs in settings where there is a lack of clean water, sanitation and hygiene. In August and September 2014, we conducted a cross-sectional epidemiological survey in 56 communities of three departments of south-central Côte d’Ivoire. Study participants were invited to provide stool and urine samples. Stool samples were examined for helminth and intestinal protozoa infections using the Kato-Katz technique and a formalin-ether concentration method. Urine samples were subjected to a filtration method for the diagnosis of Schistosoma haematobium. Information on sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge, attitude, practices and beliefs with regard to hygiene, sanitation and intestinal parasitic diseases were collected using a questionnaire administered to household heads. Multivariable logistic regression models were employed to analyse associations between parasite infections and risk factors. Overall, 4,305 participants had complete parasitological and questionnaire data. Hookworm was the predominant helminth species (21.2%), while Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium showed prevalences below 10%. Infections with pathogenic intestinal protozoa (e.g. Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar and Giardia intestinalis) were similarly prevalent in the three departments. Hookworm infection was associated with open defecation and participants' age and sex. Entamoeba coli infection was negatively associated with the use of tap water at home (odds ratio (OR) = 0.66; p = 0.032). Disposal of garbage in close proximity to people’s home was positively associated with G. intestinalis (OR = 1.30; p = 0.015). Taken together, helminth and intestinal protozoa infections affected a considerable proportion of rural dwellers in south-central Côte d’Ivoire at the onset of a cluster-randomised intervention trial. Our results will serve as baseline to monitor the effect of a package of interventions, including preventive chemotherapy, sanitation and health education on re-infection with helminths and intestinal protozoa.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Eco System Health Sciences > Health Impact Assessment (Utzinger)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Medical Parasitology and Infection Biology > Helminth Drug Development (Keiser)
UniBasel Contributors:Hürlimann, Eveline and Hürlimann, Eveline and Bonfoh, Bassirou and Utzinger, Jürg and Raso, Giovanna
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:2405-6731
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Language:English
Identification Number:
Last Modified:14 Sep 2018 13:26
Deposited On:02 Jul 2018 08:39

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