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Public health benefits from livestock rift valley fever control : a simulation of two epidemics in Kenya

Kimani, Tabitha and Schelling, Esther and Bett, Bernard and Ngigi, Margaret and Randolph, Tom and Fuhrimann, Samuel. (2016) Public health benefits from livestock rift valley fever control : a simulation of two epidemics in Kenya. EcoHealth, 13 (4). pp. 729-742.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/54238/

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Abstract

In controlling Rift Valley fever, public health sector optimises health benefits by considering cost-effective control options. We modelled cost-effectiveness of livestock RVF control from a public health perspective in Kenya. Analysis was limited to pastoral and agro-pastoral system high-risk areas, for a 10-year period incorporating two epidemics: 2006/2007 and a hypothetical one in 2014/2015. Four integrated strategies (baseline and alternatives), combined from three vaccination and two surveillance options, were compared. Baseline strategy included annual vaccination of 1.2-11% animals plus passive surveillance and monitoring of nine sentinel herds. Compared to the baseline, two alternatives assumed improved vaccination coverage. A herd dynamic RVF animal simulation model produced number of animals infected under each strategy. A second mathematical model implemented in R estimated number people who would be infected by the infected animals. The 2006/2007 RVF epidemic resulted in 3974 undiscounted, unweighted disability adjusted life years (DALYs). Improving vaccination coverage to 41-51% (2012) and 27-33% (2014) 3 years before the hypothetical 2014/2015 outbreak can avert close to 1200 DALYs. Improved vaccinations showed cost-effectiveness (CE) values of US$ 43-53 per DALY averted. The baseline practice is not cost-effective to the public health sector.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Human and Animal Health > Mobile Populations and Health (Schelling)
UniBasel Contributors:Schelling, Esther and Fuhrimann, Samuel
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1612-9202
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Identification Number:
Last Modified:20 Apr 2017 12:41
Deposited On:20 Apr 2017 12:41

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