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Association of Alcohol Consumption and HIV Surrogate Markers in Participants of the Swiss HIV Cohort Study

Conen, A. and Wang, Q. and Glass, T. R. and Fux, C. A. and Thurnheer, M. C. and Orasch, C. and Calmy, A. and Bernasconi, E. and Vernazza, P. and Weber, R. and Bucher, H. C. and Battegay, M. and Fehr, J.. (2013) Association of Alcohol Consumption and HIV Surrogate Markers in Participants of the Swiss HIV Cohort Study. Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, 64 (5). pp. 472-478.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/52600/

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Alcohol consumption may affect the course of HIV infection and/or antiretroviral therapy (ART). The authors investigated the association between self-reported alcohol consumption and HIV surrogate markers in both treated and untreated individuals. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. METHODS: Over a 7-year period, the authors analyzed 2 groups of individuals in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study: (1) ART-naive individuals remaining off ART and (2) individuals initiating first ART. For individuals initiating first ART, time-dependent Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association between alcohol consumption, virological failure, and ART interruption. For both groups, trajectories of log-transformed CD4 cell counts were analyzed using linear mixed models with repeated measures. RESULTS: The authors included 2982 individuals initiating first ART and 2085 ART naives. In individuals initiating first ART, 241 (8%) experienced virological failure. Alcohol consumption was not associated with virological failure. ART interruption was noted in 449 (15%) individuals and was more prevalent in severe compared with none/light health risk drinkers [hazard ratio: 2.24, 95% confidence interval: 1.42 to 3.52]. The association remained significant even after adjusting for nonadherence. The authors did not find an association between alcohol consumption and change in CD4 cell count over time in either group. CONCLUSIONS: No effect of alcohol consumption on either virological failure or CD4 cell count in both groups of ART-initiating and ART-naive individuals was found. However, severe drinkers were more likely to interrupt ART. Efforts on ART continuation should be especially implemented in individuals reporting high alcohol consumption.
Faculties and Departments:03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Klinische Forschung > Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics CEB
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Klinische Forschung > Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics CEB > Klinische Epidemiologie (Bucher H)
UniBasel Contributors:Bucher, Heiner C.
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:1525-4135
e-ISSN:1944-7884
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
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Last Modified:06 Oct 2017 10:10
Deposited On:06 Oct 2017 10:10

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