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Particulate matter air pollution components and risk for lung cancer

Raaschou-Nielsen, O. and Beelen, R. and Wang, M. and Hoek, G. and Andersen, Z. J. and Hoffmann, B. and Stafoggia, M. and Samoli, E. and Weinmayr, G. and Dimakopoulou, K. and Nieuwenhuijsen, M. and Xun, W. W. and Fischer, P. and Eriksen, K. T. and Sørensen, M. and Tjønneland, A. and Ricceri, F. and de Hoogh, K. and Key, T. and Eeftens, M. and Peeters, P. H. and Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B. and Meliefste, K. and Oftedal, B. and Schwarze, P. E. and Nafstad, P. and Galassi, C. and Migliore, E. and Ranzi, A. and Cesaroni, G. and Badaloni, C. and Forastiere, F. and Penell, J. and De Faire, U. and Korek, M. and Pedersen, N. and Östenson, C.-G. and Pershagen, G. and Fratiglioni, L. and Concin, H. and Nagel, G. and Jaensch, A. and Ineichen, A. and Naccarati, A. and Katsoulis, M. and Trichpoulou, A. and Keuken, M. and Jedynska, A. and Kooter, I. M. and Kukkonen, J. and Brunekreef, B. and Sokhi, R. S. and Katsouyanni, K. and Vineis, P.. (2016) Particulate matter air pollution components and risk for lung cancer. Environment international, 87. pp. 66-73.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/42392/

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Abstract

Particulate matter (PM) air pollution is a human lung carcinogen; however, the components responsible have not been identified. We assessed the associations between PM components and lung cancer incidence.; We used data from 14 cohort studies in eight European countries. We geocoded baseline addresses and assessed air pollution with land-use regression models for eight elements (Cu, Fe, K, Ni, S, Si, V and Zn) in size fractions of PM2.5 and PM10. We used Cox regression models with adjustment for potential confounders for cohort-specific analyses and random effect models for meta-analysis.; The 245,782 cohort members contributed 3,229,220person-years at risk. During follow-up (mean, 13.1years), 1878 incident cases of lung cancer were diagnosed. In the meta-analyses, elevated hazard ratios (HRs) for lung cancer were associated with all elements except V; none was statistically significant. In analyses restricted to participants who did not change residence during follow-up, statistically significant associations were found for PM2.5 Cu (HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.01-1.53 per 5ng/m(3)), PM10 Zn (1.28; 1.02-1.59 per 20ng/m(3)), PM10 S (1.58; 1.03-2.44 per 200ng/m(3)), PM10 Ni (1.59; 1.12-2.26 per 2ng/m(3)) and PM10 K (1.17; 1.02-1.33 per 100ng/m(3)). In two-pollutant models, associations between PM10 and PM2.5 and lung cancer were largely explained by PM2.5 S.; This study indicates that the association between PM in air pollution and lung cancer can be attributed to various PM components and sources. PM containing S and Ni might be particularly important.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Environmental Exposures and Health > Physical Hazards and Health (Röösli)
UniBasel Contributors:de Hoogh, Kees
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0160-4120
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Identification Number:
Last Modified:12 Sep 2018 14:10
Deposited On:26 May 2016 13:45

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