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Tracing the genetic origin of Europe ’s first farmers reveals insights into their social organization

Szécsényi-Nagy, Anna and Brandt, Guido and Haak, Wolfgang and Keerl, Victoria and Jakucs, János and Möller-Rieker, Sabine and Köhler, Kitti and Mende, Balázs Gusztáv and Oross, Krisztián and Marton, Tibor and Osztás, Anett and Kiss, Viktória and Fecher, Marc and Pálfi, György and Molnár, Erika and Sebők, Katalin and Czene, András and Paluch, Tibor and Šlaus, Mario and Novak, Mario and Pećina-Šlaus, Nives and Ősz, Brigitta and Voicsek, Vanda and Somogyi, Krisztina and Tóth, Gábor and Kromer, Bernd and Bánffy, Eszter and Alt, Kurt W.. (2015) Tracing the genetic origin of Europe ’s first farmers reveals insights into their social organization. Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. Section B, Biological sciences, 282 (1805). p. 20150339.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/41893/

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Abstract

Farming was established in Central Europe by the Linearbandkeramik culture (LBK), a well-investigated archaeological horizon, which emerged in the Carpathian Basin, in today's Hungary. However, the genetic background of the LBK genesis is yet unclear. Here we present 9 Y chromosomal and 84 mitochondrial DNA profiles from Mesolithic, Neolithic Starčevo and LBK sites (seventh/sixth millennia BC) from the Carpathian Basin and southeastern Europe. We detect genetic continuity of both maternal and paternal elements during the initial spread of agriculture, and confirm the substantial genetic impact of early southeastern European and Carpathian Basin farming cultures on Central European populations of the sixth–fourth millennia BC. Comprehensive Y chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA population genetic analyses demonstrate a clear affinity of the early farmers to the modern Near East and Caucasus, tracing the expansion from that region through southeastern Europe and the Carpathian Basin into Central Europe. However, our results also reveal contrasting patterns for male and female genetic diversity in the European Neolithic, suggesting a system of patrilineal descent and patrilocal residential rules among the early farmers.
Faculties and Departments:05 Faculty of Science > Departement Umweltwissenschaften > Integrative Prähistorische und Naturwissenschaftliche Archäologie (IPNA)
UniBasel Contributors:Alt, Kurt W.
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:Royal Society of Edinburgh
ISSN:0308-2113
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
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Last Modified:20 Sep 2016 06:31
Deposited On:20 Sep 2016 06:31

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