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Relation between circulating CC16 concentrations, lung function, and development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease across the lifespan : a prospective study

Guerra, Stefano and Halonen, Marilyn and Vasquez, Monica M. and Spangenberg, Amber and Stern, Debra A. and Morgan, Wayne J. and Wright, Anne L. and Lavi, Iris and Tarès, Lluïsa and Carsin, Anne-Elie and Dobaño, Carlota and Barreiro, Esther and Zock, Jan-Paul and Martínez-Moratalla, Jesús and Urrutia, Isabel and Sunyer, Jordi and Keidel, Dirk and Imboden, Medea and Probst-Hensch, Nicole and Hallberg, Jenny and Melén, Erik and Wickman, Magnus and Bousquet, Jean and Belgrave, Danielle C. M. and Simpson, Angela and Custovic, Adnan and Antó, Josep M. and Martinez, Fernando D.. (2015) Relation between circulating CC16 concentrations, lung function, and development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease across the lifespan : a prospective study. The lancet Respiratory medicine, Vol. 3, H. 8. pp. 613-620.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6438848

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Abstract

Low concentrations of the anti-inflammatory protein CC16 (approved symbol SCGB1A1) in serum have been associated with accelerated decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We investigated whether low circulating CC16 concentrations precede lung function deficits and incidence of COPD in the general population.; We assessed longitudinal data on CC16 concentrations in serum and associations with decline in FEV1 and incidence of airflow limitation for adults who were free from COPD at baseline in the population-based Tucson Epidemiological Study of Airway Obstructive Disease ([TESAOD] n=960, mean follow-up 14 years), European Community Respiratory Health Survey ([ECRHS-Sp] n=514, 11 years), and Swiss Cohort Study on Air Pollution and Lung Diseases in Adults ([SAPALDIA] n=167, 8 years) studies. Additionally, we measured circulating CC16 concentrations in samples from children aged 4-6 years in the Tucson Children's Respiratory Study (n=427), UK Manchester Asthma and Allergy Study (n=481), and the Swedish Barn/children, Allergy, Milieu, Stockholm, Epidemiological survey (n=231) birth cohorts to assess whether low CC16 concentrations in childhood were predictive for subsequent lung function.; After adjustment for sex, age, height, smoking status and intensity, pack-years, asthma, and FEV1 at baseline, we found an inverse association between CC16 concentration and decline in FEV1 in adults in TESAOD (4·4 mL/year additional FEV1 decline for each SD decrease in baseline CC16 concentration, p=0·0014) and ECRHS-Sp (2·4 mL/year, p=0·023); the effect in SAPALDIA was marginal (4·5 mL/year, p=0·052). Low CC16 concentration at baseline was also associated with increased risk of incident stage 2 airflow limitation (ratio of FEV1 to forced expiratory volume [FEV1/FVC] less than 70% plus FEV1 % predicted less than 80%) in TESAOD and ECRHS-Sp. In children, the lowest tertile of CC16 concentrations was associated with a subsequent FEV1 deficit of 68 mL up to age 16 years (p=0·0001), which was confirmed in children who had never smoked by age 16 years (-71 mL, p>0·0001).; Low concentrations of CC16 in serum are associated with reduced lung function in childhood, accelerated lung function decline in adulthood, and development of moderate airflow limitation in the general adult population.; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and European Union Seventh Framework Programme.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Chronic Disease Epidemiology > Genetic Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases (Probst-Hensch)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Public Health > Sozial- und Präventivmedizin > Genetic Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases (Probst-Hensch)
UniBasel Contributors:Imboden, Medea and Probst Hensch, Nicole
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:2213-2600
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
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Last Modified:06 Nov 2015 10:21
Deposited On:06 Nov 2015 10:21

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