edoc

Ambient air pollution and adult asthma incidence in six European cohorts (ESCAPE)

Jacquemin, Bénédicte and Siroux, Valérie and Sanchez, Margaux and Carsin, Anne-Elie and Schikowski, Tamara and Adam, Martin and Bellisario, Valeria and Buschka, Anna and Bono, Roberto and Brunekreef, Bert and Cai, Yutong and Cirach, Marta and Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise and Declercq, Christophe and de Marco, Roberto and de Nazelle, Audrey and Ducret-Stich, Regina E. and Ferretti, Virginia Valeria and Gerbase, Margaret W. and Hardy, Rebecca and Heinrich, Joachim and Janson, Christer and Jarvis, Deborah and Al Kanaani, Zaina and Keidel, Dirk and Kuh, Diana and Le Moual, Nicole and Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J. and Marcon, Alessandro and Modig, Lars and Pin, Isabelle and Rochat, Thierry and Schindler, Christian and Sugiri, Dorothea and Stempfelet, Morgane and Temam, Sofia and Tsai, Ming-Yi and Varraso, Raphaëlle and Vienneau, Danielle and Vierkötter, Andrea and Hansell, Anna L. and Krämer, Ursula and Probst-Hensch, Nicole M. and Sunyer, Jordi and Künzli, Nino and Kauffmann, Francine. (2015) Ambient air pollution and adult asthma incidence in six European cohorts (ESCAPE). Environmental Health Perspectives, 123 (6). pp. 613-621.

[img] PDF - Published Version
252Kb

Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6390999

Downloads: Statistics Overview

Abstract

Short-term exposure to air pollution has adverse effects among patients with asthma, but whether long-term exposure to air pollution is a cause of adult-onset asthma is unclear.; We aimed to investigate the association between air pollution and adult onset asthma.; Asthma incidence was prospectively assessed in six European cohorts. Exposures studied were annual average concentrations at home addresses for nitrogen oxides assessed for 23,704 participants (including 1,257 incident cases) and particulate matter (PM) assessed for 17,909 participants through ESCAPE land-use regression models and traffic exposure indicators. Meta-analyses of cohort-specific logistic regression on asthma incidence were performed. Models were adjusted for age, sex, overweight, education, and smoking and included city/area within each cohort as a random effect.; In this longitudinal analysis, asthma incidence was positively, but not significantly, associated with all exposure metrics, except for PMcoarse. Positive associations of borderline significance were observed for nitrogen dioxide [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.10; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.21 per 10 μg/m3; p = 0.10] and nitrogen oxides (adjusted OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.08 per 20 μg/m3; p = 0.08). Nonsignificant positive associations were estimated for PM10 (adjusted OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 0.88, 1.23 per 10 μg/m3), PM2.5 (adjusted OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 0.88, 1.23 per 5 μg/m3), PM2.5absorbance (adjusted OR = 1.06; 95% CI: 0.95, 1.19 per 10-5/m), traffic load (adjusted OR = 1.10; 95% CI: 0.93, 1.30 per 4 million vehicles × meters/day on major roads in a 100-m buffer), and traffic intensity (adjusted OR = 1.10; 95% CI: 0.93, 1.30 per 5,000 vehicles/day on the nearest road). A nonsignificant negative association was estimated for PMcoarse (adjusted OR = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.87, 1.14 per 5 μg/m3).; Results suggest a deleterious effect of ambient air pollution on asthma incidence in adults. Further research with improved personal-level exposure assessment (vs. residential exposure assessment only) and phenotypic characterization is needed.; Jacquemin B, Siroux V, Sanchez M, Carsin AE, Schikowski T, Adam M, Bellisario V, Buschka A, Bono R, Brunekreef B, Cai Y, Cirach M, Clavel-Chapelon F, Declercq C, de Marco R, de Nazelle A, Ducret-Stich RE, Ferretti VV, Gerbase MW, Hardy R, Heinrich J, Janson C, Jarvis D, Al Kanaani Z, Keidel D, Kuh D, Le Moual N, Nieuwenhuijsen MJ, Marcon A, Modig L, Pin I, Rochat T, Schindler C, Sugiri D, Stempfelet M, Temam S, Tsai MY, Varraso R, Vienneau D, Vierkötter A, Hansell AL, Krämer U, Probst-Hensch NM, Sunyer J, Künzli N, Kauffmann F. 2015. Ambient air pollution and adult asthma incidence in six European cohorts (ESCAPE). Environ Health Perspect 123:613-621; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408206.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Chronic Disease Epidemiology > Air Pollution and Health (Künzli)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Public Health > Sozial- und Präventivmedizin > Air Pollution and Health (Künzli)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Chronic Disease Epidemiology > Genetic Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases (Probst-Hensch)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Public Health > Sozial- und Präventivmedizin > Genetic Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases (Probst-Hensch)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Biostatistics > Biostatistics - Frequency Modelling (Schindler)
UniBasel Contributors:Schikowski, Tamara and Ducret-Stich, Regina and Keidel, Dirk and Schindler, Christian and Tsai, Ming and Vienneau, Danielle and Vienneau, Danielle and Probst Hensch, Nicole and Künzli, Nino
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
ISSN:0091-6765
e-ISSN:1552-9924
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article -- Reproduced with permission from Environmental Health Perspectives
Language:English
Identification Number:
Last Modified:31 Aug 2017 08:39
Deposited On:03 Jul 2015 08:53

Repository Staff Only: item control page